The career ladder

Getting a job When Paul left school he applied for (= wrote an official request for) a job in the accounts department of a local engineering company. They gave him a job as a trainee (= a very junior person in a company). He didn’t earn very much but they gave him a lot of…

types of sentences by purpose

Sentences have different purposes. Some make statements. Some ask questions. Others give commands, and still others express strong feelings. Here are the four types of sentences by purpose: &#10162 A declarative sentence makes a statement or expresses an opinion. Use a period at the end of a declarative sentence. Andy Murray has a great will…

Prepositions after gay

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. gay in – He wasn’t gay in the background. – Gay in 2011 had a season best 9. – You can live being gay in Moscow. – Ian exclaimed that I was both an atheist AND gay in Jamaica, and we…

imperative

When we say Have a drink, Come here or Sleep well, we are using imperative verb forms: have, come and sleep. Imperatives have exactly the same form as the infinitive without to. We use them, for example, for telling people what to do, making suggestions, giving advice, giving instructions, encouraging people, and offering things. Look…

10 Ways to Say Someone’s Talented

1. She was born to… [dance]. 2. He’s a natural. 3. She could do it in her sleep. 4. He knows it inside out. 5. She knows [New York] like the back of her hand. 6. She’s a walking encyclopedia of… [philosophy]. 7. He’s in a class of his own. 8. He’s the best in…

Prepositions after usual

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. usual for – But it? s not usual for us to hug. – Fruit usual for the Fabaceae family. – It? s also unusual for her to come to mine. – In this case it is usual for the first name…

Prepositions after admissible

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. admissible in – But it’s not admissible in court. – Such tests, however, are not admissible in court. – Remaining will be admissible in 3rd or 4th quarters. – The WGA’s Document Registry although admirable, is not admissible in a court…

Prepositions after inclusive

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. inclusive of – This is not inclusive of the $7. – Inclusive of other perspectives 2. – That is inclusive of the insurance. – I had to shorten my trip to only 4 days inclusive of the travelling time to Europe….

Clear for Clean

Clear for Clean Don’t Say: You should keep your hands clear. Say: You should keep your hands clean. Note: Clean is the opposite of dirty. Clear means transparent or unfounded: clear water, a clear sky.

Prepositions after major

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. major in – Why do you want to major in? – My uncle is a major in the army. – In short, he is a major insider. – I saw a major in the 3rd regiment take out his pistol and…

Prepositions after tailor-made

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. tailor-made for – It is tailor-made for the child. – They are tailor-made for the job. – It’s also tailor-made for a movie. – I finally concluded that his gift was just tailor-made for my father’s physique. – The songs were…

Phrasal verbs: form and meaning

Formation A phrasal verb is a verb combined with an adverb or preposition, and occasionally with an adverb and preposition. The price of petrol may go up (= increase) again next week. He fell over (= fell to the ground) when he was running for the bus. She’s promised to find out (= learn/discover) the…

From for Since

From for Since Don’t Say:Ian’s been ill from last Friday. Say:Ian’s been ill since iast Friday. Note:From can also denote a point in time, but it must be followed by to or till: He works from eight o’clock till one o’clock without a break. Place the preposition since before words or phrases denoting a point…

Prepositions after romantic

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. romantic about – I’d not really romantic about it. – What’s not romantic about that? 9. – I am not romantic about Vancouver. – They used to have an Abe Lincoln-themed room (odd, not much romantic about him ). – There…

know / meet

Meet has two meanings: When you have first contact with a person: “I met him last year.” (NOT “I knew him last year.”) When you will encounter someone you already know. In this case, we often use “meet with” or “meet up with”: “I’m meeting up with some friends at the bar after work.” Know…

Using the present continuous for a habitual action, instead of the simple present

Using the present continuous for a habitual action, instead of the simple present Don’t Say:Every morning I’m going for a walk. Say:Every morning I go for a walk. Note:Use the present continuous to express a habitual action with the word always or with a verb denoting a continuous state: He is always talking in class:…

ceiling / roof

The upper interior surface of a room is called the ceiling. The upper exterior surface of a building is called the roof. A tall apartment building has many ceilings inside it, because each level has its own ceiling – but it only has one roof, at the very top.

Prepositions after average

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. average in – That’s average in the industry. – I felt so average in comparison. – Jim Jablonski was average in most ways. – I am average in the looks department, not ugly, but not model like in any way at…

Prepositions after dear

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. dear to – You are dear to me too Wilfried. – Such a person is very dear to me. – Art is dear to the Filipino soul. – This ad made me cry — remembering those dear to me who lost…

Prepositions after unprepared

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. unprepared for – I was also unprepared for the size. – Unprepared for the national debates. – They were unprepared for the attack. – His comment is that this will leave the party unprepared for the general election. – The military…

Prepositions after emblematic

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. emblematic of – They are emblematic of civilization. – Surely, one is emblematic of the other. – Beauregard School is emblematic of a cause Mr. – His maternal grandfather Ahmad Hasan Khan continues to be emblematic of the place. – It…

Prepositions after optimistic

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. optimistic about – We can be optimistic about that. – Asia, I am more optimistic about. – I am optimistic about the future. – Eagan Mayor Mike Maguire is cautiously optimistic about the influx of new jobs. – Sounding optimistic about…

Finish (= come to the end of)

Finish (= come to the end of) Don’t Say:I’ve finished from my work. Say:I’ve finished my work.

eventual(ly)

Eventual and eventually mean ‘final(ly)’, ‘in the end’. We use them when we say that something happened after a long time, or a lot of work. The chess game lasted for three days. Androv was the eventual winner. The car didn’t want to start, but eventually I got it going. Eventual(ly) is a ‘false friend’…

Prepositions after irresistible

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. irresistible to – That combo is irresistible to pervs. – I wish I were irresistible to women. – So that was just irresistible to me. – He is being guided every step of the way and he will be irresistible to…

Prepositions after bankrupt

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. bankrupt in – He was made a bankrupt in 2006. – Scotland wasn’t bankrupt in 1707. – The company went bankrupt in 2001. – It started as a weekly in 1907, changed to daily in 1912, but went bankrupt in 1915….

Prepositions – Ahead Of

1. Ahead of means closer to a destination than or in front of.My friend arrived first, and was ahead of me in line. 2. Ahead of means before.You are in a hurry; please go ahead of me. 3. Ahead of can mean more advanced than.Because he was absent for two weeks, the other students in…

Beautiful for Handsome or Good-looking

Beautiful for Handsome or Good-looking Don’t Say:He’s grown into a beautiful young man. Say:He’s grown into a handsome young man. Note:We usually say that a man is handsome or good-looking, and that a woman is beautiful, lovely, good looking or pretty.

Uncountable nouns and plural nouns

Uncountable nouns Uncountable nouns (e.g. information): – don’t have a plural form (information*); – are used with a singular verb (the information ate); – cannot be used with the indefinite article ‘a/an’. (I want a«-information) These uncountable nouns are often countable in other languages. Look at them carefully. He refused to give me more information…