Everyday problems

Things that go wrong in houses and flats Everyday minor injuries Other everyday problems – I’ve mislaid Bob’s letter. Have you seen it anywhere? [put it somewhere and can’t find it] – She spilt some coffee on the carpet. I hope it doesn’t stain, [leave a permanent mark] – I overslept this morning and was…

A for An

A for An Don’t Say:A animal, a orange, a hour. Say:An animal, an orange, an hour. Note:Use an instead of a before a vowel or a silent h (as in hour, heir, honest). Before a long u or a syllable having the sound of you, we use a (not an); a union, a European (but…

15 Comparative Idioms

1. It’s as light as a feather.2. It’s as dry as a bone.3. It’s as flat as a pancake.4. He’s as mad as a hornet.5. It’s as old as the hills.6. It’s as quick as lightning.7. She’s as sick as a dog.8. He’s as strong as an ox.9. They’re as different as night and day.10….

Worth + -ing

Worth + -ing Don’t Say:Is today’s film worth to see? Say:Is today’s film worth seeing?

Spend on, not for

Spend on, not for Don’t Say:I spend a lot of time for my computer. Say:I spend a lot of time on my computer.

ago / back / before

Ago and back are used for past times from the present moment: I graduated from high school ten years ago. (ten years in the past from today) We sent the package three days ago. (three days in the past from today) I moved here about five years back. (informal – five years in the past…

Prepositions after hopeful

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. hopeful of – That’s what we’re hopeful of doing. – Kajal is now hopeful of making further. – It makes us very hopeful of the future. – More than this, in fact: it made us happy and hopeful of some wonderful…

What animals do

Cats mew when they’re hungry, purr when they’re happy and caterwaul when they’re on the roof at midnight. Dogs bark. They also growl when they’re angry. Lions roar. Sheep and goats bleat, horses neigh and pigs grunt. Cows moo. Frogs croak and ducks quack. Cocks crow, hens cluck and owls hoot. N.B. All these verbs…

surely

Surely does not mean the same as certainly. Compare: That’s certainly a mouse. (= I know that’s a mouse.) Surely that’s a mouse? (= That seems to be a mouse. How surprising!) Surely ex presses surprise. We can use surely not to show that we do not want to believe something, or find it difficult…

adjectives ending in -ly

Many adverbs end in -ly for example happily, nicely. But some words that end in -ly are adjectives, not adverbs. – The most important are friendly, lovely, lonely, ugly, silly, cowardly, likely, unlikely. – She gave me a friendly smile. Her singing was lovely There are no adverbs friendly or friendlily, lovely or lovelily, etc….

10 Ways to Respond to “Thank You”

1. You’re welcome.2. No problem.3. No worries.4. Don’t mention it.5. My pleasure.6. Anytime.7. It was the least I could do.8. Glad to help.9. Sure!10. Thank you. (use this when you ALSO have something to thank the other person for)

Expressions With get

Get seems to be used all the time in spoken English. It has the following basic meanings: • receive, obtain or buy something, e.g. Please get me a newspaper when you’re in town; I got a letter from John today; She got top marks in her exam. • show a change in position – move…

Prepositions after uneasy

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. uneasy about – Yet he was not uneasy about it. – Im a bit uneasy about this site. – I am uneasy about the joke below. – But at least some of the woolly liberals remain uneasy about our Ancient Liberties….

Misuse of adjective for adverb

Misuse of adjective for adverb Don’t Say:The little girl sang beautiful. Say:The little girl sang beautifully. Note:After verb such as look, feel, sound, smell use an adjective instead of an adverb: Sugar tastes sweet (not sweetly). We use an adverb, and not an adjective, to qualify a verb.

Jobs

The medical profession These people treat (= give medical treatment and try to solve a medical problem) and look after (= care for / take care of) others: doctor, nurse, surgeon (= a specialist doctor who works in a hospital and operates on people), dentist, and vet (= animal doctor). The word ‘vet’ is a…

some: special uses

We can use some (with the strong pronunciation /said/) to make a contrast with others, all or enough. Some people like the sea; others prefer the mountains. Some of us were late, but we were all there by ten o’clock. I’ve got some money, but not enough. We can use some (/saiti/) with a singular…

Using the simple present instead of the present continuous

Using the simple present instead of the present continuous Don’t Say:Look! Two boys fight. Say:Look! Two boys are fighting. Note:We also use the present continuous for the future when something is pre-arranged or expected with some certainty: Lorna is arriving tomorrow at six. Tom and I are eating out tonight.

Insist on + -ing

Insist on + -ing Don’t Say: Simon insisted to go to London. Say: Simon insisted on going to London.

Misuse of it’s for its

Misuse of it’s for its Don’t Say:The bird was feeding it’s young. Say:The bird was feeding its young. Note:The possessive adjective its is correctly written without the apostrophe. So also hers, ours, yours, theirs take no apostrophe.

Prepositions after ready

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. ready for – Ready for the Rest of her Life. – Tuesday, ready for the printer. – But get ready for the march to. – This royal beauty is ready to set it off! Ready for the destruction of song and…

gut / guts

The word gut refers to a part of the body, but it has some metaphorical meanings, too. Your “gut” is your stomach. Some men have a “beer gut” (a big stomach from drinking too much beer!) and some people talk about wanting to do exercise to “lose their gut” (make their stomach smaller). We also…

Prepositions after lucrative

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. lucrative for – ON is definitely not lucrative for jobs. – It may be seductive and lucrative for some. – This needs to stop being lucrative for them. – The next five years will be lucrative for us here, and we…

Prepositions after unfortunate

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. unfortunate for – It’s really unfortunate for him. – So far, so unfortunate for Bruce. – This is unfortunate for everyone. – Whatever the explanation, this is obviously extremely unfortunate for Mr Tucker. – How unfortunate for some rulers when men,…

Prepositions after embarrassing

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. embarrassing for – Much less embarrassing for you. – How embarrassing for our country. – How utterly embarrassing for you. – It was so embarrassing for the Republicans FOX news cut away from the coverage. – It was so embarrassing for…

Prepositions after exemplar

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. exemplar of – Zizek is the best exemplar of this today. – Perhaps the best exemplar of this is Dianora. – An exemplar of a serious game is America’s Army. – The Swans are a lesson in redemption, a first-rate exemplar…

Prepositions after sacred

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. sacred to – Myths are sacred to the people. – Jerusalem is sacred to us both. – And also, Weeds is sacred to me. – I was later told that I shouldn’t have killed the snake as it was sacred to…

Independent of, not from

Independent of, not from Don’t Say:Clare’s independent from her parents, Say:Clare’s independent of her parents. Note:We say dependent on: A child is dependent on its parents.

possessives: my and mine, etc

My, your, his, her, its, one’s, our and their are determiners. In grammars and dictionaries they are often called ‘possessive adjectives’. That’s my watch. We cannot use my, youretc together with other determiners (for example a, the, this). You cannot say a my friend or the my car or this my house. (For the structure…

Prepositions after rotten

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. rotten to – They are all rotten to the core. – And so we are: rotten to the core. – Rotten to the core this government. – United are rotten to the fuckin core with tofay mr f saying Benitez is…

Prepositions after dangerous

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. dangerous for – This is very dangerous for the. – Very dangerous for the rest of the world. – Dangerous for whole globe, including USA. – These myths are more dangerous for the fact that we have forgotten they are myths….