get and go: movement

Get is used for the end of a movement — the arrival. Go is used for the whole movement. Compare: I go to work by car and Lucy goes by train. I usually get there first. I went to Bristol yesterday. I got to Bristol at about eight o’clock. We often use get when there…

future: shall and will (interpersonal uses)

We can use shall and will to express our intentions and attitudes towards other people. Decisions We use will at the moment of making a decision. ‘The phone s ringing.’ I’ll answer it. ‘ (NOT I’m going to answer it.) ‘I’m going out for a drink. ‘ ‘Wait a moment and I’ll come with you….

future: shall/will (predictions)

Forms [ I shall/will you will he/she/it will we shall/will they will] – + infinitive without to questions: shall/will I; will you, will he/she/it, etc. negatives: I will/shall not you will not, etc. contractions: I’ll, you’ll, he’lletc; shan’t, won’t. In modern English, I shall and I will, we shall and we will are used with…

future: introduction

There are several ways to talk about the future in English. Present tenses When we talk about future events which are already decided now, or which we can see now ‘are on the way’, we often use present tenses. There are two possibilities: the present progressive , I am… -ing and a structure with the…

country

Country (countable) = ‘nation’, ‘land’. Scotland is a cold country. France is the country I know best. How many countries are there in Europe? The country (uncountable) = ‘open land without many buildings’ (the opposite of the town). With this meaning, we cannot say a country or countries. My parents live in the country near…

countable and uncountable nouns

Countable nouns are the names of separate objects, people, ideas etc which we can count. We can use numbers and a/an with countable nouns; they have plurals. a cat three cats a newspaper two newspapers Uncountable nouns are the names of materials, liquids, and other things which we do not see as separate objects. We…

before (conjunction)

[clause + before + clause before + clause, + clause] We can use before to join two clauses. We can either say: A happened before B happened OR Before B happened, A happened. The meaning is the same: A happened first. Note the comma (,) in the second structure. I bought a lot of new…

as and like

Similarity We can use like or as to say that things are similar. a. Like is a preposition. We use like before a noun or pronoun. [like + noun/pronoun] You look like your sister. (NOT … as your sister.) He ran like the wind. It’s like a dream. She’s dressed just like me. We use…