Prepositions – Among

1. Among can mean surrounded by. Pattern: verb + among + plural (three or more) nounThey camped in the woods among the trees. 2. Among can mean with each other. Pattern: verb + among + plural (three or more) nounThe children quarreled among themselves. Typical verbs before among:argue, celebrate, debate, discuss something, fight, play, share…

Prepositions – Along

1. Along means following the boundary of something. Pattern: verb + along + nounWe walked along the water’s edge at the beach last night. Typical verbs before along: jog, stroll, run, walk 2. Along with means together. Pattern: verb + along with + nounHe used to sing along with me. Typical verbs used before along…

Prepositions – Against

Against means touching something or somebody for support. Pattern 1: verb + against + nounThe man was leaning against his car. Typical verbs used before against: hang, lean, lie, rest, sleep Pattern 2: verb + noun + against + nounThey held the mirror against the wall. Typical verbs used before against:butt, hold, keep, lay, lean,…

Using Capital Letters

Here are some useful capitalization rules to follow. Capitalize the first word of every sentence. Your poem was read at this morning’s assembly. Begin the session now. Capitalize the pronoun I as a word and in a contraction. This card is something that I cherish. I’ve a funny story to tell you. Capitalize proper nouns…

Active and passive voices

Voice is a verb form that indicates if the sentence’s subject performs or receives an action. There are two types of voice—active voice and passive voice. ➲ If the sentence’s subject performs the action, the sentence is written in the active voice. ‘‘The pilot landed the plane’’ is written in the active voice since the…

would rather

Would rather means ‘would prefer to’. It is followed by the infinitive without to. We often use the contraction’d rather: this means ‘would rather’, not ‘had rather’. [ would rather + infinitive without to] Would you rather stay here or go home? ‘How about a drink?’ I’d rather have something to eat.’ We can use…

future: shall/will (predictions)

Forms [ I shall/will you will he/she/it will we shall/will they will] – + infinitive without to questions: shall/will I; will you, will he/she/it, etc. negatives: I will/shall not you will not, etc. contractions: I’ll, you’ll, he’lletc; shan’t, won’t. In modern English, I shall and I will, we shall and we will are used with…

as and like

Similarity We can use like or as to say that things are similar. a. Like is a preposition. We use like before a noun or pronoun. [like + noun/pronoun] You look like your sister. (NOT … as your sister.) He ran like the wind. It’s like a dream. She’s dressed just like me. We use…