Transitive and intransitive verbs

A transitive verb is an action verb that has a direct object. Remember that
a direct object (a noun or a pronoun) answers the question Whom? or What?
after the action verb. Thus, in the sentence, ‘‘The clown threw the toy into
the air,’’ the verb, threw, is transitive because (A) it is an action verb, and (B)
there is a direct object, toy.

Here are some other examples of transitive verbs. The verb is underlined, and
the direct object is italicized.

Danielle wanted pizza for lunch.
The old shed really needs repairs.
We believed him.

An intransitive verb is an action verb, but it does not have a direct object
following it. In the sentence, ‘‘Veronica remained here after the incident,’’
the intransitive verb, remained, does not have a direct object after it. No noun
or pronoun receives the action of the verb.

Some other examples of intransitive verbs are these.
They laughed quite loudly.
The boys sprinted from the alley.
These scientists know about physics.