the pronoun

The pronoun, the second of the eight parts of speech, is a word that takes
the place of a noun.

➲In the sentence, ‘‘Felipe is an intelligent student,’’ the noun, Felipe, can
be replaced by the singular pronoun he. Thus, the new sentence reads,
‘‘He is an intelligent student.’’
➲In the sentence, ‘‘We offered the baseball tickets to Rita and Drew,’’
the nouns, Rita and Drew, can be replaced by the plural pronoun,
them. The new sentence will now read, ‘‘We offered the baseball tickets
to them.’’

There are several types of pronouns.
Personal pronouns refer to people, places, things, and ideas. I, me, you,
your, they, us, and it are all personal pronouns.

Reflexive pronouns are formed by adding ‘‘-self’’ or ‘‘-selves’’ to cer-
tain
personal pronouns. They ‘‘reflect’’ back to the person or thing
mentioned in the sentence. Myself, himself, herself, itself, yourself, your-
selves,
and themselves are reflexive pronouns. There is no such word as
theirselves.

Demonstrative pronouns can be singular or plural. They point out a
specific person, place, or thing. This, that, these, and those are demonstrative
pronouns.

Interrogative pronouns, like their name suggests, are used when asking
a question. Who, whom, which, and whose are interrogative pronouns.
Indefinite pronouns do not refer to a specific person, place, or thing.
Some indefinite pronouns are another, both, everyone, most, no one, and
several.