the noun clause

object of the preposition, or
a predicate nominative. This type of clause often starts with any one of these
words—how, that, what, whatever, when, where, whether, which, whichever, who,

whoever, whom, whomever, whose, and why.

The noun clause is underlined in each of these sentences. Its function within
the sentence follows in the parentheses.

What you thought about that candidate is correct. (subject)
The paleontologist remembers when he met you at the conference.
(direct object)
Will these older folks recall how they were part of a terrific
generation?
(direct object)
Remind whoever is on your discussion panel that we will meet
tomorrow morning in the library. (indirect object)
Give whoever needs that information the correct numbers.
(indirect object)
Mr. Bellington reminded us of where we should obtain the necessary
papers for our licenses
. (object of the preposition)
My children’s request is that you wear your silly tie to the birthday
party.
(predicate nominative)
The lady’s wish is that you bring her some pansies and daisies.
(predicate nominative)