e.g. / i.e.

Both of these abbreviations come from Latin phrases:

  • e.g. = exempli gratia (for example) – used to introduce examples
  • i.e. = id est (that is) – used to say something in other words, in order to make things clearer or provide more information

    Here are some examples of how to use e.g.:

  • He hates studying the sciences, e.g. biology, chemistry, and physics.

    (biology, chemistry, and physics are examples of sciences)

  • The after-school program focuses on team sports, e.g. soccer and basketball. (soccer and basketball are examples of the team sports in the program)
  • Her report contains many mistakes, e.g. the economic statistics are completely inaccurate.

    (the error in the statistics is an example of the mistakes in the report)

    We typically only use e.g. in writing. When speaking, we would simply say “for example,” “such as,” or “like” instead.

    Here are some similar examples of how to use i.e.:

  • He hates studying the sciences, i.e. he has no interest in being a chemist like his father.

    (the second statement provides more information that logically follows from the first statement)

  • The after-school program focuses on team sports, i.e. it aims to help children learn to work together.

    (the first and second statements are two different ways to express the activities of the after-school program)

  • Her report contains many mistakes, i.e. it needs to be revised.

    (again, the first and second statements are two ways to talk about the problems with the report)

    We typically only use i.e. in writing. When speaking, we would use “that is” or “in other words” instead.