Sit at a desk etc, not on a desk etc

Sit at a desk etc, not on a desk etc Don’t Say:The bank manager was sitting on his desk. Say:The bank manager was sitting at his desk. Note:Also sit at a table. But on a chair, on a bench, on a sofa, etc; in an arm-chair, in a tree or up a tree. A bird…

Using the comparative instead of the superlative

Using the comparative instead of the superlative Don’t Say:Cairo is the larger city in Africa. Say:Cairo is the largest city in Africa. Note:Use the superlative when more than two persons or things are compared

Convince and Persuade

Convince and Persuade Don’t Say:I am persuaded of Robin’s innocence. Say:I am convinced of Robin’s innocence. Note:Care must be taken no! to confuse persuade with pursued, the pasi tense of pursue (= to follow). Persuade and convince have very similar meanings and are mostly interchangeable in modern English; Delia persuaded me to take the exam…

Allow (to) or let (= give permission to)

Allow (to) or let (= give permission to) Don’t Say:The driver allowed/let to John (to) sit in the front seat. Say:The driver allowed/let John (to) sit in the front seat. Note:Permit has a similar meaning to let though it’s used in more formal situations: The teacher doesn’t permit us to talk in class.

Misuse of rest as an adjective

Misuse of rest as an adjective Don’t Say:I spent the rest day at home. Say:I spent the rest of the day at home. Note:Here, rest is a noun, and we can’t use it as an adjective in the meaning of what’s left.

Covered with, not by

Covered with, not by Don’t Say:The mountains are covered by snow. Say:The mountains are covered with/in snow.

Using what or which after everything, etc

Using what or which after everything, etc Don’t Say:I heard everything which (or what) he said. Say:I heard everything (that) he said. Note:Don’t use the relative pronouns which and what after everything, atf, something, anything, a lot, (not much), little, or Nothing We can use that after these words, or it can be omitted.

Wrong use of personal pronoun in a relative clause

Wrong use of personal pronoun in a relative clause Don’t Say:The book which I lost it was new. Say:The book which I lost was new. Note:Don’t use a personal pronoun as well as a relative in the relative clause if They both refer to the same noun In the first sentence both which and it…

The qualifying adjective misplaced

The qualifying adjective misplaced Don’t Say:My uncle has a garden very large. Say:My uncle has a very large garden. Note:Put the adjective immediately before the noun it qualifies.

Presently for At present

Presently for At present Don’t Say:His uncle is in London presently. Say:His uncle is in London at present. Note:At present and presently are not synonymous At present means now, but presently means soon: She will come back presently (= sooa)