The unrelated participle

The unrelated participle Don’t Say:Being in a hurry, the door was left open. Say:Being in a hurry, he left the door open. Note:Take care to provide the logical subject relating to the participle phrase In the sentence given, the logical subject to being In haste is he and not the door.

Substitute for Replace with

Substitute for Replace with Don’t Say:They substituted gold with paper money. Say:They replaced gold with paper money. Note:We replace one thing with another, but. we substitute one thing for another The two phrase* mean the reverse of each other You replace gold with paper money you substitute paper money for gold’

Using the other day instead of the next day ,etc

Using the other day instead of the next day ,etc Don’t Say:David slept well and was better the other day. Say:David slept well and was better the next day (or on the following day). Note:The other day is an idiom maiming a few days ago l met an old the other day

Using must or ought to to express a past obligation

Using must or ought to to express a past obligation Don’t Say:You ought to come yesterday. Say:You ought to have come yesterday. Or; You should have come yesterday. Note:In indirect speech use must and ought to as past tenses: He said he must do it. Don’t use must and ought to as past tenses To…

Some for Any – Some

Some for Any – Some Don’t Say:Louis has got any milk. Say:Louis has got some milk.

Wrong use of the with man denoting the human race

Wrong use of the with man denoting the human race Don’t Say:The man is born a sinner. Say:Man is born a sinner, Note:Use man, denoting the human race, without the definite article. Also, mankind requires no article Disease is the enemy of mankind.

Misuse of weight as a verb

Misuse of weight as a verb Don’t Say:Have you weighted the letter? Say:Have you weighed the letter? Note:Weight is a noun and we can’t use it as a verb. The verb is weigh (wtthout the t).

Look forward to + -ing

Look forward to + -ing Don’t Say:I look forward to see him soon. Say:I look forward to seeing him soon.

Using under the rain instead of in the rain

Using under the rain instead of in the rain Don’t Say:They played football under the rain. Say:They played football in the rain. Note:Also in the sun and in the shade He was sitttng in the sun (or in the shade)

Like and Love

Like and Love Don’t Say:I like you! Will you marry me? Say:I love you! Will you marry me? Note:Both verbs can be used for people and things the only difference is one of degree. Love is much stronger than like.

Accustomed to, not with

Accustomed to, not with Don’t Say:I’m accustomed with hot weather. Say:I’m accustomed to hot weather. Note:Also used to: He is used to the heat.

Wrong use of the with material nouns

Wrong use of the with material nouns Don’t Say:The gold is a precious metal. Say:Gold is a precious metal. Note:Material nouns, used n a particular sense, require the definite article The coal from the Midlands exported to many countries. Don’t use any article with material nouns, If used in a general sense.

See + infinitive without to

See + infinitive without to Don’t Say:They saw him to leave the house. Say:They saw him leave the house. Note:They saw him leaving the house is also correct.

Hardly for Hard

Hardly for Hard Don’t Say:She rubbed her eyes hardly. Say:She rubbed her eyes hard. Note:Hard means severely. Hardly means not quite or scarcely: The baby can hardly walk.

No and Not – Not

No and Not – Not Don’t Say:I have made no any mistakes in dictation. Say:I haven’t (= have not) made any mistakes in dictation. Note:We only use no as an adverb before a comparative: I have no more fo say. We use no meaning not any, as an adjective to qualify the noun. If the…

Organ for Instrument

Organ for Instrument Don’t Say:What other organ can you play? Say:What other instrument can you play? Note:The organ is a particular musical Instrument used in some churches to accompany the singing of hymns. Don’t use organ to denote any other musical instrument.

Wrong use of the with the names of the senses

Wrong use of the with the names of the senses Don’t Say:The sight is one of the five senses. Say:Sight is one of the five senses. Note:Don t use an article before the names of the five senses: sight, smell, hearing, taste and touch.

Translate into, not to

Translate into, not to Don’t Say:Translate this passage to English. Say:Translate this passage into English.

Fruit

Fruit Don’t Say:We didn’t have many fruits this summer. Say:We didn’t have much fruit this summer. Note:We rarely use the plural form fruits which means, different kinds of fruit; Cyprus produces oranges, apricots, and other fruits.

Scarcely for Rarely

Scarcely for Rarely Don’t Say:Zoe scarcely comes to see me now. Say:Zoe rarely comes to see me now. Note:Scarcely isn’t synonymous with rarely Rarely means not often, scarcely, means not quite: I had scarcely finished when he came.

Die of an illness, not from an illness

Die of an illness, not from an illness Don’t Say:Many people have died.from malaria. Say:Many people have died of malaria. Note:People die of ilfness, of hunger, of thirst, of or from wounds; from overwork; by violence, by the sword, by pestilence; in battle; for their country, for a cause, through neglect; on the scaffold; at…

On, At, In (Time) – On

On, At, In (Time) – On Don’t Say: My uncle will arrive at Saturday. Say: My uncle will arrive on Saturday.

Rise and Raise – Raise

Rise and Raise – Raise Don’t Say:She rose their salaries too often. Say:She raised their salaries too often. Note:Arise is often used for rise, but it is better to use arise only in the sense of begin A quarrel (a discussion, an argument, a difficulty, ere.) may arise This is formal but is still used.

Omission of a or an after the word half

Omission of a or an after the word half Don’t Say:He drank half glass of milk. Say:He drank half a glass of milk. Note:Half a glass {an hour, a day, a mile, etc.) is the shortened form of half of a glass (of an hour, of a day, of a mile, etc.).

Agreement of number between noun and verb

Agreement of number between noun and verb Don’t Say:A large supply of toys are expected. Say:A large supply of toys is expected. Note:When the subject is singular, the verb must be singular and when the subject is plural, the verb must also be plural. Take care when a plural noun comes between a singular subject…

Look at, not to

Look at, not to Don’t Say:Look to this beautiful picture. Say:Look at this beautiful picture. Note:Also gaze at, stare at, etc But; look after (= take care of); look for (= try to find), look over (= examine); look into != examine closely), look on or upon (= consider); look down on (= have a…

Make and Do – Do

Make and Do – Do Don’t Say:You must make your work carefully. Say:You must do your work carefully.

Wrong repetition of subject in a compound sentence

Wrong repetition of subject in a compound sentence Don’t Say:I went to the market and I bought fruit. Say:I went to the market and bought fruit. Note:In a compound sentence, express the same subject once only and don’t repeat it before each verb, unless the sentence is long and complicated.

Reach (= arrive at)

Reach (= arrive at) Don’t Say:We reached at the school early. Say:We reached the school early.