Older (oldest) and Elder (eldest) – Older, Oldest

Older (oldest) and Elder (eldest) – Older, Oldest Don’t Say:This girl is eider than that one. This girl is the eldest of all Say:This girl is older than that one. This girl is the oldest of all.

Misuse of the plural with the name of a language

Misuse of the plural with the name of a language Don’t Say:English are easier than German. Say:English is easier than German. Note:Names of languages are singular and always take a singular verb.

Glad about, not from or with

Glad about, not from or with Don’t Say:Francis was glad from (or with) receiving your letter. Say:Francis was glad about receiving your letter.

Good at, not in

Good at, not in Don’t Say:My sister’s good in maths, Say:My sister’s good at maths. Note:1: Bad at, clever at, quick at, slow at, etc however, weak in: He’S weak in grammar. 2: He’s good in class means that his conduct is good.

Live on, not /rom

Live on, not /rom Don’t Say:He lives from his brother’s money. Say:He lives on his brother’s money. Note:Feed on’ Soma birds feed on insects

Answer (= reply to)

Answer (= reply to) Don’t Say:Please answer to my question. Say:Please answer my question. Note:The noun answer takes to: His answer to my question was wrong.

Omission of the auxiliary do from questions

Omission of the auxiliary do from questions Don’t Say:You understand the problem?or He understands the problem?She understood the problem? Say:Do you understand the problem?Or Does he understand the problem? Did she understand the problem? Note:Don’t use the auxiliary do with modal verbs, like can, may, must: Can you meet me tomorrow? Place the auxiliary verb…

Borrow and Lend – Borrow

Borrow and Lend – Borrow Don’t Say:I want to lend a book from you. Say:I want to borrow a book from you.

Mount or get on a horse, etc not ride a horse, etc

Mount or get on a horse, etc not ride a horse, etc Don’t Say:Peter rode his horse and went home. Say:Peter got on his horse and rode home. Note:To ride denotes a continuous action. To mount or To get on denotes a simple action.

Lie and Lay – Lie

Lie and Lay – Lie Don’t Say:I’m going to lay down for an hour. Say:I’m going to lie down for an hour.

Feel + infinitive without to

Feel + infinitive without to Don’t Say:I could feel her heart to beat, Say:I could feel her heart beat. Or: I could feel her heart beating. Note:If the verbs make, see, watch, hear, feel, are used in the passive, to must be used He-was seen to leave the house : He was heard to speak…

Thunder and Lightning

Thunder and Lightning Don’t Say:There were thunders and lightnings. Say:There was thunder and lightning. Note:When only one thing-is meant we say a clap of thunder and a flash or bolt of lighting.

Conform to, not with

Conform to, not with Don’t Say:We must conform with the rules. Say:We must conform to the rules. Note:comply takes with. We’ll comply with your request.

Each and Every

Each and Every Don’t Say: Each child had an apple. Say: Every child had an apple. Note: Each and every are always singular: Each (or every) one of the twenty boys has a book.

Repent of, not from

Repent of, not from Don’t Say:He repented from his crime. Say:He repented of his crime. Note:Repentance takes for. He feels repentance for sm

Suspect of, not for

Suspect of, not for Don’t Say:I suspect Kate for stealing the pen. Say:I suspect Kate of stealing the pen. Note:Also suspicious of: Dogs are suspicious of srangers.

Borrow and Lend – Lend

Borrow and Lend – Lend Don’t Say:Will you please borrow me a book? Say:Will you please lend me a book? Note:To borrow is to get something from someone, and to lend is to give something to someone.

Accuse of, not for

Accuse of, not for Don’t Say:She accused the man for stealing. Say:She accused the man of stealing. Note:Charge takes with The man was charged with murder.

Small Big for Young Old

Small Big for Young Old Don’t Say:I’m two years smaller than you. She’s three years bigger than me. Say:I’m two years younger than you. She’s three years older than me. Note:Great refers to the importance of a person or thing; Napoleon was a great man, Homer’s Iliad is a great book Use great with words…

Misuse of good for well

Misuse of good for well Don’t Say:The goalkeeper plays very good. Say:The goalkeeper plays very well. Note:Good is an adjective only, and we can’t use it as an adverb

By for With

By for With Don’t Say:The man shot the bird by a gun. Say:The man shot the bird with a gun.

Misuse of truth as an adjective

Misuse of truth as an adjective Don’t Say:Is it truth that Diana’s very ill? Say:Is it true that Diana’s very ill? Note:Truth isn’t adjective but a noun The adjective is- true, and we use t with no article between it and the verb to fee

All not used instead of Not all

All not used instead of Not all Don’t Say:All people are not hard-working. Say:Not all people are hard-working. Note:Similarly, Everybody doesn’t like dancing should be Not evorybody likes dancing. The first sentence is wrong because it makes all people lazy.

Be with for Have

Be with for Have Don’t Say:My English book is with my brother. Say:My brother has my English book.

Related to, not with

Related to, not with Don’t Say:Are you related with Simon in any way? Say:Are you related to Simon in any way? Note:Also relation to; Is he any relation to you?

Who and Whom – Whom

Who and Whom – Whom Don’t Say:Who do you think I saw yesterday? Say:Whom do you think I saw yesterday?