Consider as used instead of consider

Consider as used instead of consider Don’t Say:Robert considers me as his best friend. Say:Robert considers me his best friend. Note:Don’t use as after the word consider We say he regard me as his best friend or Robert considers me to be his best fnend.

Say and Tell

Say and Tell Don’t Say:He told, I will/’ll go home.He told that he’d go home. Say:He said, ‘I will/’ll go home.He said that he’d go home.

Using a country instead of the country

Using a country instead of the country Don’t Say:I spend my holidays in a country. Say:I spend my holidays in the country. Note:A country is a place like France, India, or Egypt. The country is a rural area where there are no towns or cities.

Make and Do – Do

Make and Do – Do Don’t Say:You must make your work carefully. Say:You must do your work carefully.

Anxious (= troubled) about, not /or

Anxious (= troubled) about, not /or Don’t Say:They’re anxious for his health. Say:They’re anxious about his health. Note:Anxious meaning wishing very much takes for. Parents are anxious for their children’s success.

Good at, not in

Good at, not in Don’t Say:My sister’s good in maths, Say:My sister’s good at maths. Note:1: Bad at, clever at, quick at, slow at, etc however, weak in: He’S weak in grammar. 2: He’s good in class means that his conduct is good.

Surprised at or by not for

Surprised at or by not for Don’t Say:Harold was surprised for the loud bang. Say:Harold was surprised at/by the loud bang. Note:Also astonished at/by, amazed at/by, alarmed at/by, puzzled at/by, shocked at/by

Money + singular verb

Money + singular verb Don’t Say:All her money are kept in the bank. Say:All her money is kept in the bank. Note:Money is a singular noun and always take, a singular verb and pronoun.

Quietly, not slowly, slowly

Quietly, not slowly, slowly Don’t Say:The boy came in slowly, slowly. Say:The boy came in quietly.

To and Till – To

To and Till – To Don’t Say:We walked till the river and back. Say:We walked to the river and back.

Sympathise for Like

Sympathise for Like Don’t Say:I don’t sympathise him very much. Say:I don’t like him very much. Note:Sympathise isn’t synonymous with like To sympathise with means to share some feeling (usually of sorrow) with another person: I sympathise with you in your sorrow

Omission of the word and between numbers

Omission of the word and between numbers Don’t Say:Eight thousand thirty-seven. Say:Eight thousand and thirty-seven. Note:Use the conjunction and to connect hundred, thousand, million to a number of tens or units

Have the pleasure of + -ing

Have the pleasure of + -ing Don’t Say:I had the pleasure to meet him. Say:I had the pleasure of meeting him. Note:Also take pleasure in He takes great pleasure in helping other.

Wrong use of the with society

Wrong use of the with society Don’t Say: A thief is a danger to the society. Say: A thief is a danger to society. Note: Use the definite article if society is used (1) in a particular sense: The society of The Greeks was based on freedom; (2) in the sense of companionship: I enjoy…

Omission of the verb to be from the passive

Omission of the verb to be from the passive Don’t Say:Charles Dickens born in 1812. Say:Charles Dickens was born in 1812. Note:Form the passive form by using the verb to be, combined with the past participle of the verb required (to be + past participle)

Omission of the direct object when there are two objects

Omission of the direct object when there are two objects Don’t Say:I asked him for some ink, and he gave me. Say:I asked him for some ink, and he gave me some. Note:Some transitive verbs, like give, bring, send, tell, buy, show, must have two expressed objects, direct and indirect: here, some is the direct…

Very and Too – Very

Very and Too – Very Don’t Say:It’s too hot in Rome in the summer. Say:It’s very hot in Rome in the summer.

Sick or Ill

Sick or Ill Don’t Say:He’s been sick for over a year. Say:He’s been ill for over a year. Note:We can also use sick before certain nouns The sick room, a sick note, sick leave We use the plural noun the sick to mean ill people Angela worked with (he sick on the streets of Birmingham….

Using at the end instead of in the end

Using at the end instead of in the end Don’t Say:At the end they reached the city. Say:In the end they reached the city. Note:In the end means finally or at last at the end means at the farthest point or pan There’s an index at the end of this book. There ‘s a holiday…

The possessive ending omitted

The possessive ending omitted Don’t Say:A hen’s egg is different from a pigeon. Say:A hen’s egg is different from a pigeon’s. Note:If the first noun in a comparison is in the possessive case, the second must also be m the possessive: My mother’s nose is bigger than my father’s

Wrong use of the with material nouns

Wrong use of the with material nouns Don’t Say:The gold is a precious metal. Say:Gold is a precious metal. Note:Material nouns, used n a particular sense, require the definite article The coal from the Midlands exported to many countries. Don’t use any article with material nouns, If used in a general sense.

Take revenge and Avenge

Take revenge and Avenge Don’t Say:I must avenge myself for what he did to me! Say:I must take revenge for what he did to me! Note:Avenge and revenge oneself are now only found in literary English. We usually use take revenge (on). We might also say He must have his revenge

And etc used instead of etc

And etc used instead of etc Don’t Say:I, you, we, and etc. are pronouns. Say:I, you, we, etc., are pronouns. Note:However, students are advised to avoid using etc. in an essay and to use phrases such as and other things, and so on instead. Etc. is the short form of et cetera, a Latin phrase…

The subject misplaced in questions beginning with an interrogative word

The subject misplaced in questions beginning with an interrogative word Don’t Say:Why you were absent last Friday? Say:Why were you absent last Friday? Note:In questions beginning with interigative word like what, when, where, how, place he verb before the subject as in all questions.

Have one’s hair cut, not cut one’s hair

Have one’s hair cut, not cut one’s hair Don’t Say:I’m going to cut my hair. Say:I’m going to have my hair cut. Note:Avoid I’ll make a o air of shoes(or a suit of clothes). Say instead I’ll have a pair of shoes (or a suit of clothes) made.

The same as/same that

The same as/same that Don’t Say:Amelia bought the same bag that me. Say:Amelia bought the same bag as me. Note:Sometimes we use that instead of who or which after same. He wore the same clothes that he wore on Sunday. After the same we use as unless it’s followed by a subordinate clause, in which…

In and At – At

In and At – At Don’t Say:My mother is staying in 66 Argyle Street. Say:My mother is staying at 66 Argyle Street. Note:We use at when we’re talking about an address, a public place or building (a bus slop, the Post Office, the library etc.) and cases in which the location urelpt’dnt but wtat we…

For this used instead of for this reason

For this used instead of for this reason Don’t Say:For this he wants to leave. Say:For this reason he wants to leave. Note:The phrase for this is incorrect- Say for this reason or for that reason Also owing to that or because of that.