No doubt (n) of or about, not for

No doubt (n) of or about, not for Don’t Say:I’ve no doubt for his ability. Say:I’ve no doubt of (or about) his ability. Note:Doubtful of: I am doubtful of his ability to pass.

The possessive ending omitted

The possessive ending omitted Don’t Say:A hen’s egg is different from a pigeon. Say:A hen’s egg is different from a pigeon’s. Note:If the first noun in a comparison is in the possessive case, the second must also be m the possessive: My mother’s nose is bigger than my father’s

Wrong use of the with material nouns

Wrong use of the with material nouns Don’t Say:The gold is a precious metal. Say:Gold is a precious metal. Note:Material nouns, used n a particular sense, require the definite article The coal from the Midlands exported to many countries. Don’t use any article with material nouns, If used in a general sense.

Go to home used instead of go home

Go to home used instead of go home Don’t Say:When school is over I go to home. Say:When school is over I go home. Note:The expression I go ro home wrong Say, I go home.

Let for Make (= to force)

Let for Make (= to force) Don’t Say:The examiner let me sit quietly until everyone had finished. Say:The examiner made me sit quietly until everyone had finished. Note:Don’t use let, in the sense of make, meaning to force.

Using neither or instead of neither nor

Using neither or instead of neither nor Don’t Say:Sara speaks neither English or French. Say:Sara speaks neither English nor French. Note:Remember Neither must be followed by nor and not by or. Either is followed by or she drinks either orange juice or apple juice.

Steal and Rob – Rob

Steal and Rob – Rob Don’t Say:Some men stole a bank last night. Say:Some men robbed a bank last night. Note:The object of steal is the thing taken by the thief, such as money, a watch, a bicycle, etc, while the object of rob is the person Of place from whom (or which) the thing…

Progress

Progress Don’t Say:Tom has made great progresses. Say:Tom has made great progress.

Shade or Shadow – Shade

Shade or Shadow – Shade Don’t Say:I like to sit in the shadow. Say:I like to sit in the shade.

Made from and Made of – Made of

Made from and Made of – Made of Don’t Say:The statue is made from marble. Say:The statue is made of marble. Note:We usually use of when you can still recognise the original material. We use from when the-original materials are unrecognisable. In most cases either is possible.

Popular with, not among

Popular with, not among Don’t Say:John’s popular .among his friends. Say:John’s popular with his friends.

Who and whom

Who and whom Don’t Say:I saw the woman whom you said lived next door. Say:I saw the woman (who) you said lived next door. Note:We rarely use whom in modern English. We still use it after prepositions to, by, with, after, on etc. For example. The girl to whom you were speaking is Nigerian, We…

For and At (Price) – For

For and At (Price) – For Don’t Say:I bought a book at fifty pence. Say:I bought a book for fifty pence.

The unrelated participle

The unrelated participle Don’t Say:Being in a hurry, the door was left open. Say:Being in a hurry, he left the door open. Note:Take care to provide the logical subject relating to the participle phrase In the sentence given, the logical subject to being In haste is he and not the door.

Wrong repetition of subject

Wrong repetition of subject Don’t Say:My little brother he is at school. Say:My little brother is at school. Note:Never repeat the subject by using a pronoun after the noun My little brother and he denote the same person Therefore, use one or the other as subject, but not both.

Convince and Persuade

Convince and Persuade Don’t Say:I am persuaded of Robin’s innocence. Say:I am convinced of Robin’s innocence. Note:Care must be taken no! to confuse persuade with pursued, the pasi tense of pursue (= to follow). Persuade and convince have very similar meanings and are mostly interchangeable in modern English; Delia persuaded me to take the exam…

Hear + infinitive without to

Hear + infinitive without to Don’t Say:We heard him to speak in English. Say:We heard him speak in English. Note:We heard him speaking in English is also correct.

Throw it used instead of throw it away

Throw it used instead of throw it away Don’t Say:It’s dirty, throw it. Say:It’s dirty, throw it away. Note:Throw it means to throw a thing at someone or somewhere, such as a ball. Throw it away means to get rid of it by throwing it aside.

Omission of it as subject of an impersonal verb

Omission of it as subject of an impersonal verb Don’t Say:Is very hot in the Sudan. Say:It’s very hot in the Sudan. Note:Use the pronoun it as the subject of an impersonal verb.

Play for Game

Play for Game Don’t Say:They had a nice play of football. Say:They had a nice game of football. Note:Avoid using play in the sense game. Play means amusement He is fond of piay.

Mount or get on a horse, etc not ride a horse, etc

Mount or get on a horse, etc not ride a horse, etc Don’t Say:Peter rode his horse and went home. Say:Peter got on his horse and rode home. Note:To ride denotes a continuous action. To mount or To get on denotes a simple action.

Used to + -ing

Used to + -ing Don’t Say: She’s used to get up early. Say: She’s used to getting up early.

Wrong use of the with school

Wrong use of the with school Don’t Say:My sister goes to the school. Say:My sister goes to school. Note:Similarly, to leave school means to stop being a student and to leave the school means to go away from the school premises. To go to school means to be a student, while to go to the…

Found for Find

Found for Find Don’t Say:Rosie tried to found her lost book, Say:Rosie tried to find her lost book. Note:There is, however, another verb to found, meaning to establish: He founded the school fifty years ago.

And etc used instead of etc

And etc used instead of etc Don’t Say:I, you, we, and etc. are pronouns. Say:I, you, we, etc., are pronouns. Note:However, students are advised to avoid using etc. in an essay and to use phrases such as and other things, and so on instead. Etc. is the short form of et cetera, a Latin phrase…

Misuse of miser as an adjective

Misuse of miser as an adjective Don’t Say:Jill loved money; she was miser. Say:Jill loved money; she was a miser. Note:Miser is a noun, and we can’t use it as adjective the adjective is miserly.She was miserly.