Fish

Fish Don’t Say:Yesterday we had fishes for dinner. Say:Yesterday we had fish for dinner. Note:Fish as food or in bulk (= large numbers) is always singular We rarely use the plural form (fishes) which denotes fish individually: I caught three small fishes.

Using the past perfect instead of the simple past tense

Using the past perfect instead of the simple past tense Don’t Say:I’d finished the book yesterday Say:I finished the book yesterday. Note:Don’t use the past perfect unless there is another verb the past tense in the same sentence.

Stop + -ing

Stop + -ing Don’t Say:The wind has almost stopped to blow. Say:The wind has almost stopped blowing. Note:Also give up(=stop)He give up smoking.

Omission of the preposition after the infinitive

Omission of the preposition after the infinitive Don’t Say:They’ve no houses to live. Say:They’ve no houses to live in. Note:The infinitive of an intransitive verb (like live, etc,): it must have a preposition after it.

Related to, not with

Related to, not with Don’t Say:Are you related with Simon in any way? Say:Are you related to Simon in any way? Note:Also relation to; Is he any relation to you?

Feel + infinitive without to

Feel + infinitive without to Don’t Say:I could feel her heart to beat, Say:I could feel her heart beat. Or: I could feel her heart beating. Note:If the verbs make, see, watch, hear, feel, are used in the passive, to must be used He-was seen to leave the house : He was heard to speak…

Using any for two, instead of either

Using any for two, instead of either Don’t Say: Any of these two books is good. Say: Either of these two books is good. Note: Either means one or the other of two, any means one of three or more Any of these books will do.

Misuse of due to as a preposition

Misuse of due to as a preposition Don’t Say:William came late due to an accident. Say:William came late because of an accident. Note:Don’t use due to as a preposition meaning beiause of. Due, as an adjective here, is used correctly only when it qualifies some noun: His delay due to an accident.

The possessive ending omitted

The possessive ending omitted Don’t Say:A hen’s egg is different from a pigeon. Say:A hen’s egg is different from a pigeon’s. Note:If the first noun in a comparison is in the possessive case, the second must also be m the possessive: My mother’s nose is bigger than my father’s

For and At (Price) – For

For and At (Price) – For Don’t Say:I bought a book at fifty pence. Say:I bought a book for fifty pence.

Angry for Sorry

Angry for Sorry Don’t Say:I was angry to hear of her death. Say:I was sorry to hear of her death.

Small Big for Young Old

Small Big for Young Old Don’t Say:I’m two years smaller than you. She’s three years bigger than me. Say:I’m two years younger than you. She’s three years older than me. Note:Great refers to the importance of a person or thing; Napoleon was a great man, Homer’s Iliad is a great book Use great with words…

Say to a person, not say a person

Say to a person, not say a person Don’t Say:Kevin said me, Come tomorrow.’ Say:Kevin said to me, ‘Come tomorrow.’

Progress

Progress Don’t Say:Tom has made great progresses. Say:Tom has made great progress.

Place for Room

Place for Room Don’t Say:Is there place for me on the bus? Say:Is there room for me on the bus? Note:Don’t use place in the sense of room, which means here unoccupied space.

Misuse of others as an adjective

Misuse of others as an adjective Don’t Say:The others boys aren’t here. Say:The other boys aren’t here. Note:Others isn’t an adjective but a pronoun. The adjective fs otfrer (without the s) We can say. The others aren’t here omitting thtf noun boys

Misuse of adjective for adverb

Misuse of adjective for adverb Don’t Say:The little girl sang beautiful. Say:The little girl sang beautifully. Note:After verb such as look, feel, sound, smell use an adjective instead of an adverb: Sugar tastes sweet (not sweetly). We use an adverb, and not an adjective, to qualify a verb.

Omission of the before names of nationalities

Omission of the before names of nationalities Don’t Say:English are fond of sports. Say:The English are fond of sports. Note:Place the definite article before the names of nationalities, describing a people collectively: the British, the French, the Dutch, the Swiss, the Chinese, the Sudanese, etc.

Finish + -ing

Finish + -ing Don’t Say:Have you finished to speak? Say:Have you finished speaking? Note:To + infinitive or the gerund follow verbs meaning to begin She began to speak, or She began speaking.

Please for Ask or Thank

Please for Ask or Thank Don’t Say:I pleased him to do me a favour; or: I pleased him for his lovely present. Say:I asked him to do me a favour; and: I thanked him for his lovely present. Note:To please means to give pleasure to I worked hard to please my teacher.

Let for Rent and Hired out for Hire – Rent

Let for Rent and Hired out for Hire – Rent Don’t Say:I let the house from Mr Jones. Say:I rent the house from Mr Jones. Note:To rent something is to pay to use it. usually for a long period of time a house, a car, a piano etc. To let something is to allow someone…

Superior to, not from or than

Superior to, not from or than Don’t Say:This is superior from (or than) that. Say:This is superior to that. Note:Also inferior to. junior to, senior to, subsequent to, prior to.

After for In

After for In Don’t Say:I may be able to go after a week. Say:I may be able to go in a week.Or: I may be able to go in a week’s time. Note:When speaking of a period of time in the future, use in, and not after. Here in means after the end of.

The conjunction misplaced in a time clause

The conjunction misplaced in a time clause Don’t Say:Emma when she arrived the boat had already gone. Say:When Emma arrived the boat had already gone. Note:Place the conjunction introducing an adverbial clause of time at the beginning of a clause.

The object of the transitive verb omitted

The object of the transitive verb omitted Don’t Say:I asked her for some paper, but she had not. Say:I asked her for some paper, but she had none/didn’t have any. Note:As a rule, every transitive verb must have an expressed object: here, none (equivalent to not any) is the abject of had.

The ordinal numeral misplaced

The ordinal numeral misplaced Don’t Say:I’ve read the two first chapters. Say:I’ve read the first two chapters. Note:Place ordinal numerals before cardinal numerals There can’t be two first chapters, only one. Similarly, we must say. The list two [three, etc.), and not The two (three, etc.) last.

Omission of other after a comparative

Omission of other after a comparative Don’t Say:Homer was greater than all the Greek poets. Say:Homer was greater than all the other Greek poets. Note:Since Homer was a Greek poet, the first sentence makes him greater than himself, which is illogical.