Hundred, etc

Hundred, etc Don’t Say:The town has fifty thousands people. Say:The town has fifty thousand people. Note:Hundred, thousand, and million take the plural form if they’re not preceded by a numeral or by a: Thousands of people were present.

Luggage

Luggage Don’t Say:Her luggages are at the station. Say:Her luggage is at the station. Note:Baggage, another word for luggage, can’t be used in the plural either The baggage is ready for the train.

Getting on with, not going with

Getting on with, not going with Don’t Say:How is Susan going with her work? Say:How is Susan getting on with her work?

Enter (= go into)

Enter (= go into) Don’t Say:We entered into the classroom. Say:We entered the classroom. Note:We enter into a conversation, a debate, or a dfscussion.

Misuse of the plural before kind or sort

Misuse of the plural before kind or sort Don’t Say:I don’t like these kind of games. Say:I don’t like this kind of game. Or: I don’t like games of this kind. Note:The demonstrative word (this/that etc ) must agreewith its noun. In the example, kind is singular and so this must agree with it.

Damage

Damage Don’t Say:The fire caused many damages. Say:The fire caused much damage. Note:The plural form damages denotes money paid to make good a loss: The insurance company paid the man damages.

The direct object misplaced

The direct object misplaced Don’t Say:He touched with his hand the ball. Say:He touched the ball with his hand. Note:The object of a transitive verb generally comes directly after the verb.

Using an object pronoun in a double genitive

Using an object pronoun in a double genitive Don’t Say:A friend of him told us the news. Say:A friend of his told us the news. Note:We use the double genitive (of + name + ‘s, his, mine etc ) when we want to emphasise the person who possesses rather than the thing which he possesse…

Misuse of hot as a noun

Misuse of hot as a noun Don’t Say:There’s much hot this summer. Say:It’s very hot this summer. Note:Hot is an adjective only, and we can’t use it as a noun. The noun is heat.

Omission of the personal pronoun after a quotation

Omission of the personal pronoun after a quotation Don’t Say:‘I’m learning English,’ said. Say:‘I’m learning English,’ he said. Note:After a quotation, express the personal pronoun as the subject of the reporting verb.

Misuse of the adjective in the plural

Misuse of the adjective in the plural Don’t Say:The rich have a duty to help the poors. Say:The rich have a duty to help the poor. Note:Adjectives can’t take the plural form, even when they’re used as nouns in the plural.

Wrong repetition of object

Wrong repetition of object Don’t Say:The doctor I know him very well. Say:I know the doctor very well. Note:In ihe sentence given, the worcs doctor and him denote one and the same object Therefore, use either doctor or him, but not both in the same sentence-. In general we don’t put the object before the…

Take for Get

Take for Get Don’t Say:Clare took a good mark in chemistry. Say:Clare got a good mark in chemistry. Note:To take means to obtain something intentional or by force: I took a book from the library. The army took the city. To get or to receive means to obtarn something which isgrven such as a gift,…

Wrong use of the with names of diseases

Wrong use of the with names of diseases Don’t Say:The cholera is a dreadful disease. Say:Cholera is a dreadful disease. Note:The indefinite article is needed with common names of illnesses: I was suffering from a cold (a fever, a cough, a headache). As g rule, don’t use the definite article before the names of diseases.

To and At – To

To and At – To Don’t Say:We come at school every morning. Say:We come to school every morning.

Rise and Raise – Rise

Rise and Raise – Rise Don’t Say:Val raises very early in the morning. Say:Val rises very early in the morning.

Shall and Will – In the third person 2

Shall and Will – In the third person 2 Don’t Say:My mind is made up: he will/’lf go. Say:My mind is made up: he shall go. Note:Should, the past tense of shall, and would, the past tense of will, have the same differences of meaning and use as the present forms shall and will I…

Wrong use of the with names of days and months

Wrong use of the with names of days and months Don’t Say:The Sunday can be a day of prayer. The December is the last month. Say:Sunday can be a day of prayer. December is the last month. Note:We say the Sunday before last, the December of 1940, etc. Don’t use The definite article before the…

For to used instead of to

For to used instead of to Don’t Say:I came here for to learn English. Say:I came here to learn English.

Round (= on all sides of)

Round (= on all sides of) Don’t Say:The earth goes round of the sun. Say:The earth goes round the sun. Note:Around is similar in meaning and use to round

Consist of, not from

Consist of, not from Don’t Say:A year consists from twelve months. Say:A year consists of twelve months. Note:Take great care never to use consist in the passive form.

Using the simple past tense instead of the present perfect

Using the simple past tense instead of the present perfect Don’t Say:I saw the Parthenon of Athens. Say:I have seen the Parthenon of Athens. Note:if we are speaking of the result of a past action rather than of the action it we must use the present perfect tense When somebody says, I have seen Parthenon,…

Cause of and Reason for – Reason for

Cause of and Reason for – Reason for Don’t Say:You have a good cause of coming. Say:You have a good reason for coming. Note:A cause is, that whjch produces a result. A reason is That which explains or justifies a result.

Customer and Client – Client

Customer and Client – Client Don’t Say:That lawyer has plenty of customers. Say:That lawyer has plenty of clients. Note:A person car. be a customer at a shop, but a client of a lawyer, a bank, etc.

Ground for Floor

Ground for Floor Don’t Say:When I entered the room, I saw a book on the ground. Say:When I entered the room, I saw a book on the floor. Note:The floor is the part of the room on which we walk The ground is outside the house

Good at, not in

Good at, not in Don’t Say:My sister’s good in maths, Say:My sister’s good at maths. Note:1: Bad at, clever at, quick at, slow at, etc however, weak in: He’S weak in grammar. 2: He’s good in class means that his conduct is good.

No and Not – No

No and Not – No Don’t Say:I’ve not made any mistakes in dictation. Say:I’ve made no mistakes in dictation.

His and Her – Her

His and Her – Her Don’t Say:Ann visits his uncle every Sunday. Say:Ann visits her uncle every Sunday. Note:In English, possessive adjectives (and pronouns) agree with the person who possesses, and not with the person or thing possessed When the possess is masculine, use his, and when the possesso.” is feminine, use her.