Say to a person, not say a person

Say to a person, not say a person Don’t Say:Kevin said me, Come tomorrow.’ Say:Kevin said to me, ‘Come tomorrow.’

Begin from used instead of begin

Begin from used instead of begin Don’t Say:Exams begin from Thursday. Say:Exams begin on Thursday. Note:A thing can begin only at a point of time The word can’t be used to apply to the whole time during which a thing is being done.

Resemble (= be similar to),

Resemble (= be similar to), Don’t Say:Does she resemble to her father? Say:Does she resemble her father? Note:Resemblance takes to or between. She bears do resemblance to her father. There is no resemblance between them

Rise and Raise – Rise

Rise and Raise – Rise Don’t Say:Val raises very early in the morning. Say:Val rises very early in the morning.

Think of + -ing

Think of + -ing Don’t Say:I often think to go to England. Say:I often think of going to England.

Using and in a negative sentence instead of or

Using and in a negative sentence instead of or Don’t Say:I don’t like red and orange. I want the blue one. Say:I don’t like red or orange, I want the blue one. Note:If we join clauses with different subjects we use and even after a negative. He didn’t write to me and I was worned….

Accustomed to, not with

Accustomed to, not with Don’t Say:I’m accustomed with hot weather. Say:I’m accustomed to hot weather. Note:Also used to: He is used to the heat.

Let for Rent and Hired out for Hire – Hire

Let for Rent and Hired out for Hire – Hire Don’t Say:I hired out a surf board when I was in America. Say:I hired a surf board when I was in America. Note:To hire something is to pay to use it, usually for a short time, with one single payment a suit, a bicycle, a…

From fov Of or In

From fov Of or In Don’t Say:He’s the tallest from all the boys. Say:He s the tallest of all the boys. Or: He’s the tallest boy in the class.

Using the future in a clause of time, instead of the present tense

Using the future in a clause of time, instead of the present tense Don’t Say:I’ll see you when I shall come back. Say:I’ll see you when I come back. Note:If the verb in the main clause is in the future, the verb in the time clause must be in the present tense

Careful of, with or about, not for

Careful of, with or about, not for Don’t Say:Elke’s very careful for her health. Say:Elke’s very careful of/about her health.Or: You should be more careful with your money. Note:Take care of: He takes care of his money.

Misuse of coward as an adjective

Misuse of coward as an adjective Don’t Say:She said, ‘You are a coward boy.’ Say:She said, ‘You are a coward.’ Note:Coward (= one without courage) is the noun. The adjective is cowardly.

Pleased with, not from

Pleased with, not from Don’t Say:The teacher is pleased from me. Say:The teacher is pleased with me. Note:We say pleased at or pleased with if an abstract noun or a clause follows; They were pleased at (or with) what he said; They were pleased at(or with) her results

Although/Though yet used instead of although/though

Although/Though yet used instead of although/though Don’t Say:Although it’s raining, yet he’ll go, Say:Although it’s raining, he’ll go. Note:Although (though) is the conjunction introducing the subordinate clause, and a second one (yet or still) isn’t required,

Borrow and Lend – Borrow

Borrow and Lend – Borrow Don’t Say:I want to lend a book from you. Say:I want to borrow a book from you.

House and Home

House and Home Don’t Say:You should go to your house now. Say:You should go home now. Note:Home may also denote ones own country When an Englishman abroad says: im going home this summer he means going to England. Take care not to say my house, his house, or your house when you should say home…

The subject misplaced in questions beginning with an interrogative word

The subject misplaced in questions beginning with an interrogative word Don’t Say:Why you were absent last Friday? Say:Why were you absent last Friday? Note:In questions beginning with interigative word like what, when, where, how, place he verb before the subject as in all questions.

Using will/’ll instead of would/’d in a subordinate clause

Using will/’ll instead of would/’d in a subordinate clause Don’t Say:He said (that) he will/’ll come tomorrow. Say:He said (that) he would/’d come tomorrow. Note:will/’ll change to would/’d subordinate causes, when the verb in the main clause is in a past tense.

Misuse of and for also or too

Misuse of and for also or too Don’t Say:Let me do and the next exercise. Say:Let’s also do the next exercise. Or: Let me do the next exercise too. Note:And is a conjunction, and can only similar iorms ot speech: He came and sac down. We can t use it instead of the adverbs aiso…

Tremble with cold, etc, not from cold etc

Tremble with cold, etc, not from cold etc Don’t Say:The man was trembling from cold. Say:The man was trembling with cold. Note:Also shake with and shiver with: The thief was shaking with tear.

To and At – To

To and At – To Don’t Say:We come at school every morning. Say:We come to school every morning.

Scene artd Scenery – Scenery

Scene artd Scenery – Scenery Don’t Say:The scene in Cyprus is beautiful . Say:The scenery in Cyprus is beautiful. Note:A scene refers to one particular place, while scenery refers to the general appearance of the country.We don’t use scenery in the plural.

Refuse and Deny – Refuse

Refuse and Deny – Refuse Don’t Say:Sarah denied to take the money. Say:Sarah refused to take the money.

Make and Do – Make

Make and Do – Make Don’t Say:The carpenter did a large table. Say:The carpenter made a large table.

Consist of, not from

Consist of, not from Don’t Say:A year consists from twelve months. Say:A year consists of twelve months. Note:Take great care never to use consist in the passive form.

Misuse of hot as a noun

Misuse of hot as a noun Don’t Say:There’s much hot this summer. Say:It’s very hot this summer. Note:Hot is an adjective only, and we can’t use it as a noun. The noun is heat.