Using the past tense instead of the past perfect

Using the past tense instead of the past perfect Don’t Say:The train already left before I arrived. Say:The train had already left before I arrived. Note:Don’t use the present tense and the past perfect in the same sentence. It would be incorrect to Say: My brother says that he had not gone to the cinema…

Misuse of able as a verb

Misuse of able as a verb Don’t Say:The poor man doesn’t able to pay. Say:The poor man isn’t able to pay. Note:Able is an adjective, and we can’t use it as a verb.

House and Home

House and Home Don’t Say:You should go to your house now. Say:You should go home now. Note:Home may also denote ones own country When an Englishman abroad says: im going home this summer he means going to England. Take care not to say my house, his house, or your house when you should say home…

Shall and Will – In the third person 2

Shall and Will – In the third person 2 Don’t Say:My mind is made up: he will/’lf go. Say:My mind is made up: he shall go. Note:Should, the past tense of shall, and would, the past tense of will, have the same differences of meaning and use as the present forms shall and will I…

Leave for Let

Leave for Let Don’t Say:Penny didn’t leave me to get my book. Say:Penny didn’t let me get my book. Note:Let means to allow Leave means to abandon or to go away from: Do you leave your books at school?

Wrong use of the with nature

Wrong use of the with nature Don’t Say:The nature is beautiful in spring. Say:Nature is beautiful in spring. Note:Use the definite article if nature is used in other meanings: If is in the nature of a dog to be faithful.

The continuous form of the tense misused

The continuous form of the tense misused Don’t Say:I m understanding the lesson now. Say:I understand the lesson now. Note:As a rule, verbs denoting a state rather than an act have.no continuous forms, like understand, know, believe, like, love, belong, prefer consist, mean, hear, see, etc.

Omission of a or an from make a noise, etc

Omission of a or an from make a noise, etc Don’t Say:I told them not to make noise. Say:I told them not to make a noise. Note:Also to make a mistake, to make a fortune, to make a will, to make an impression, to make an experiment, to make an attempt-

A for An

A for An Don’t Say:A animal, a orange, a hour. Say:An animal, an orange, an hour. Note:Use an instead of a before a vowel or a silent h (as in hour, heir, honest). Before a long u or a syllable having the sound of you, we use a (not an); a union, a European (but…

Worth + -ing

Worth + -ing Don’t Say:Is today’s film worth to see? Say:Is today’s film worth seeing?

Spend on, not for

Spend on, not for Don’t Say:I spend a lot of time for my computer. Say:I spend a lot of time on my computer.

Misuse of adjective for adverb

Misuse of adjective for adverb Don’t Say:The little girl sang beautiful. Say:The little girl sang beautifully. Note:After verb such as look, feel, sound, smell use an adjective instead of an adverb: Sugar tastes sweet (not sweetly). We use an adverb, and not an adjective, to qualify a verb.

Using the simple present instead of the present continuous

Using the simple present instead of the present continuous Don’t Say:Look! Two boys fight. Say:Look! Two boys are fighting. Note:We also use the present continuous for the future when something is pre-arranged or expected with some certainty: Lorna is arriving tomorrow at six. Tom and I are eating out tonight.

Insist on + -ing

Insist on + -ing Don’t Say: Simon insisted to go to London. Say: Simon insisted on going to London.

Misuse of it’s for its

Misuse of it’s for its Don’t Say:The bird was feeding it’s young. Say:The bird was feeding its young. Note:The possessive adjective its is correctly written without the apostrophe. So also hers, ours, yours, theirs take no apostrophe.

Independent of, not from

Independent of, not from Don’t Say:Clare’s independent from her parents, Say:Clare’s independent of her parents. Note:We say dependent on: A child is dependent on its parents.

Clear for Clean

Clear for Clean Don’t Say: You should keep your hands clear. Say: You should keep your hands clean. Note: Clean is the opposite of dirty. Clear means transparent or unfounded: clear water, a clear sky.

From for Since

From for Since Don’t Say:Ian’s been ill from last Friday. Say:Ian’s been ill since iast Friday. Note:From can also denote a point in time, but it must be followed by to or till: He works from eight o’clock till one o’clock without a break. Place the preposition since before words or phrases denoting a point…

Using the present continuous for a habitual action, instead of the simple present

Using the present continuous for a habitual action, instead of the simple present Don’t Say:Every morning I’m going for a walk. Say:Every morning I go for a walk. Note:Use the present continuous to express a habitual action with the word always or with a verb denoting a continuous state: He is always talking in class:…

Finish (= come to the end of)

Finish (= come to the end of) Don’t Say:I’ve finished from my work. Say:I’ve finished my work.

Beautiful for Handsome or Good-looking

Beautiful for Handsome or Good-looking Don’t Say:He’s grown into a beautiful young man. Say:He’s grown into a handsome young man. Note:We usually say that a man is handsome or good-looking, and that a woman is beautiful, lovely, good looking or pretty.

Using a day, etc, instead of one day, etc

Using a day, etc, instead of one day, etc Don’t Say:A day they went sight-seeing in Florence. Say:One day they went sight-seeing in Florence. Note:Use one (not a or an) with day, night, morning, afternoon and evening, when the one means on a certain ….

Could for Was able to

Could for Was able to Don’t Say:Because Laura worked hard she could finish the job in time. Say:Because Laura worked hard she was able to finish the job in time. Note:If the meaning is managed to or succeeded in doing, use was able to, and not could.

It’s no good + -ing

It’s no good + -ing Don’t Say:It’s no good to get angry. Say:It’s no good getting angry’.

Go for a walk, not make a walk

Go for a walk, not make a walk Don’t Say:We made a walk along the river. Say:We went for a walk along the river. Note:We can also say We had a walk or We took a walk along the river.

Misuse of noun/verb homonyms

Misuse of noun/verb homonyms Don’t Say:Becky played a good play of chess. Say:Becky played a good game of chess. Note:Some verbs and nouns do have the same form and analogous meaning in English The police fight a hard fight Heather dreams long vivid dreams. If you lie the he will catch you out’ The company…