Wrong repetition of object with infinitive

Wrong repetition of object with infinitive Don’t Say:I bought an English book to read it. Say:I bought an English book to read. Note:Don’t repeat an object with an infinitive of purpose if the verb takes an object.

Using can instead of could in a subordinate clause

Using can instead of could in a subordinate clause Don’t Say:Last Sunday Ailsa told me that she may come. Say:Last Sunday Ailsa told me that she might come. Note:The conjunction that is never preceded by a comma,. May changes to might in subordinate clauses, when the verb in the main clause is the past simple…

Dust for Cover with dust

Dust for Cover with dust Don’t Say:A sandstorm dusted our clothes. Say:A sandstorm covered our clothes with dust. Note:To dust doesn’t mean to cover with dust, but to remove dust from After sweeping. she dusted the furniture.

Think of + -ing

Think of + -ing Don’t Say:I often think to go to England. Say:I often think of going to England.

Capable of + -ing

Capable of + -ing Don’t Say:They’re quite capable to do that, Say:They’re quite capable of doing that. Note:Also incapable of; to + the infinitive follows able or unable He is unable to do anything.

Wrong use of the with material nouns

Wrong use of the with material nouns Don’t Say:The gold is a precious metal. Say:Gold is a precious metal. Note:Material nouns, used n a particular sense, require the definite article The coal from the Midlands exported to many countries. Don’t use any article with material nouns, If used in a general sense.

The object of the verb enjoy omitted

The object of the verb enjoy omitted Don’t Say:I enjoyed during the holidays. Say:I enjoyed myself during the holidays. Or: I enjoyed my holidays. Note:We say I had a good time, as this is an idiomatic expression, but we can’t say I enjoyed my time. We must specify. I enjoyed my time in Greece. Don’t…

Sick or Ill

Sick or Ill Don’t Say:He’s been sick for over a year. Say:He’s been ill for over a year. Note:We can also use sick before certain nouns The sick room, a sick note, sick leave We use the plural noun the sick to mean ill people Angela worked with (he sick on the streets of Birmingham….

Accuse of, not for

Accuse of, not for Don’t Say:She accused the man for stealing. Say:She accused the man of stealing. Note:Charge takes with The man was charged with murder.

Disappointed by, about or at, not from – by/at/about

Disappointed by, about or at, not from – by/at/about Don’t Say:Phillipa was disappointed from the low mark she got in the test. Say:Phillipa was disappointed by/about/at the low mark she got in the test.

The number and A number – A number

The number and A number – A number Don’t Say:A number of pupils is absent today. Say:A number of pupils are absent today. Note:When we precede number by the it denotes a unit and is singular When it’s preceded by a it means several or many and is plural.

Travel by train, etc, not with the train, etc

Travel by train, etc, not with the train, etc Don’t Say:He travelled with the train yesterday. Say:He travelled by train yesterday. Note:We Say: by train, by boat, by plane, by bike; also, by land, by sea, by air, by bus; in a bus or on a bus; by car or in a car, by taxi…

Make a mistake, not do a mistake

Make a mistake, not do a mistake Don’t Say:I did one mistake in dictation. Say:I made one mistake in dictation.

Aim at, not on or against

Aim at, not on or against Don’t Say:She aimed on {or against) the target. Say:She aimed at the target. Note:Use the preposition at to denote direction: throw at. shout at, fire at, shoot at. Shoot (without the at) means to kill He shot a bird (= he hit and killed it).

The indirect object misplaced

The indirect object misplaced Don’t Say:I showed to her some of my stamps. Say:I showed some of my stamps to her. Note:The indirect object usually comes first without a preposition I showed her some of my stamps. if the indirect object is preceded by a preposition, place it after the direct object.

Wrong use of the with plural nouns used in a general sense

Wrong use of the with plural nouns used in a general sense Don’t Say:The dogs are faithful animals. Say:Dogs are faithful animals. Note:Omit the definite article before common nouns in the plurai if used in a general sense

Quietly, not slowly, slowly

Quietly, not slowly, slowly Don’t Say:The boy came in slowly, slowly. Say:The boy came in quietly.

Tired of, not from

Tired of, not from Don’t Say:The boys are tired from eating boiled eggs. Say:The boys are tired of eating boiled eggs.

Using the simple past tense instead of the present perfect

Using the simple past tense instead of the present perfect Don’t Say:I saw the Parthenon of Athens. Say:I have seen the Parthenon of Athens. Note:if we are speaking of the result of a past action rather than of the action it we must use the present perfect tense When somebody says, I have seen Parthenon,…

Who and Whom – Whom

Who and Whom – Whom Don’t Say:Who do you think I saw yesterday? Say:Whom do you think I saw yesterday?

Progress

Progress Don’t Say:Tom has made great progresses. Say:Tom has made great progress.

Misuse of adjective for adverb

Misuse of adjective for adverb Don’t Say:The little girl sang beautiful. Say:The little girl sang beautifully. Note:After verb such as look, feel, sound, smell use an adjective instead of an adverb: Sugar tastes sweet (not sweetly). We use an adverb, and not an adjective, to qualify a verb.

Make and Do – Make

Make and Do – Make Don’t Say:The carpenter did a large table. Say:The carpenter made a large table.

Hanged and Hung – Hanged

Hanged and Hung – Hanged Don’t Say:No-one has been hung in Britain since 1964. Say:No-one has been hanged in Britain since 1964.

No and Not – No

No and Not – No Don’t Say:I’ve not made any mistakes in dictation. Say:I’ve made no mistakes in dictation.

In and Into – Into

In and Into – Into Don’t Say:Richard came in the room and sat down. Say:Richard came into the room and sat down. Note:Always write the preposition into as one word.In denotes position inside something, while into denotes motion or direction towards the inside of something.

Misuse of died for dead

Misuse of died for dead Don’t Say:I think his grandfather is died. Say:I think his grandfather is dead. Note:Died is the past tense die. The adjective is dead.

Ground for Floor

Ground for Floor Don’t Say:When I entered the room, I saw a book on the ground. Say:When I entered the room, I saw a book on the floor. Note:The floor is the part of the room on which we walk The ground is outside the house