English Writing – Improvement Tricks and Tips

As I said earlier, a language has four components – Reading, listening, speaking and writing. Each of these components is complementary to each other. Once you know how to listen, read and speak English, it is time to finish the process by writing properly.Writing is probably the easiest to do; however one can make mistakes…

enough

Enough comes after adjectives (without nouns) and adverbs. [adjective/adverb + enough] Is it warm enough for you? (NOT . . . enough warm . . .) You’re not driving fast enough. Enough comes before nouns. [enough (+ adjective) + noun] Have you got enough milk? (NOT . .. enough of milk.) There isn’t enough blue…

weak and strong forms

Some words in English have two pronunciations: one when they are stressed ,and one when they are not. Compare: I got up at /at/six o’clock. What are you looking at? /’aet/ Most of these words_are prepositions, pronouns, conjunctions, articles and auxiliary verbs. They are not usually stressed, so the unstressed (‘weak’) pronunciation is the usual…

have: introduction

We can use have in several different ways. a. auxiliary verb Have you heard about Peter and Corinne? b. to talk about possession, relationships, and other states: I’ve got a new car. Have you got any brothers or sisters? Do you often have headaches? c. to talk about actions: I’m going to have a bath….

How to Quickly Prepare and Master English Language Tests

“Of course, it is very important to be sober when you take an exam.” – Terry PratchettWhen you follow the strategies in this book and put them into action, you will become more confident in English quickly, and you will be able to speak English well. No doubt about it. However, English exams are a…

it’s time

We can use an infinitive after it’s time. It’s time to buy a new car. It’s time for you to go to bed. It’s time may also be followed by a special structure with a past tense verb. [it’s time + subject + past verb …] It’s time you went to bed. It’s time she…

more (of): determiner

We can use more before uncountable or plural nouns. [more + noun] We need more time (NOT . . . more of time.) More people are drinking wine these days. Before another determiner (for example the, my, this), we use more of. We also use more of before a pronoun. [more of + determiner +…

infinitive without to

We usually put to before the infinitive (for example I want to go; It’s nice to see you). But we use the infinitive without to in the following cases: Modal auxiliary verbs After the modal auxiliary verbs will, shall, would, should, can, could, may, might and must, and after had better, we use the infinitive…

Some Quick Steps to Learn English Grammar

Grammar can be pesky and annoying. It is not easy to learn because there are so many rules that simply do not make sense. For example, the pronunciations of ‘cat’ as ‘kat’ and ‘price’ as ‘prise’, does not make sense. Grammar can be defined as a set of notions about the correct use of a…

reported speech: orders, requests, advice etc

We usually use an infinitive structure to report orders, requests, advice and suggestions. [verb + object + infinitive] I told Andrew to be careful. The lady downstairs has asked us to be quiet after nine o’clock. I advise you to think again before you decide which one to buy. The policeman told me not to…

feel

Feel has several meanings. to touch something. – Feel the car seat. It’s wet. – Progressive tenses are possible. – ‘ What are you doing?’ I’m feeling the shirts to see if they are dry.’ to receive physical sensations. – I suddenly felt something on my leg. – We do not use progressive tenses, but…

and

        1. When we join two or more expressions, we usually put and before the last. – bread and cheese – We drank, talked and danced. – I wrote the letters, Peter addressed them, George bought the stamps – and Alice posted them. 2. In two-word expressions, we often put the shortest…

among and between

1. We say that somebody/something is between two or more clearly separate people or things. We use among when somebody/something is in a group, a crowd or a mass of people or things, which we do not see separately. Compare: – She was standing between Alice and Mary. – She was standing among a crowd…

although and though

1. Both these words can be used as conjunctions. They mean the same. Though is informal. (Al)though I don’t agree with him, I think he’s honest. She went on walking, (al)though she was terribly tired. I’ll talk to him, (although I don’t think it’ll do any good. We use even though to emphasize a contrast….

Copular verbs

We use some verbs to join an adjective to the subject. These can be called ‘copulas’ or ‘copula verbs’. Compare: The car went Fast. (Fast is an adverb. It tells you about the movement.)   The car looks fast. (Fast is an adjective. It tells you about the car itself — rather like saying The…

How to Recover Your English after a Break

“A different language is a different vision of life.”– Federico Fellini I’ve added this chapter in on special request. Learning English is a lifelong adventure. You will go through many periods of learning and then often long periods where you don’t learn or speak any English. In those moments when you haven’t spoken English for many months…

Best English Learning Resources Online & Apps

“Know what tools you have to fulfill your purpose.”― Steve Maraboli You are such a lucky English learner, because there are so many wonderful resources online to help speed up your learning today. We’ve already mentioned a few amazing resources. Like Skype and Italki.com for speaking daily with native speakers. Vis-Ed.com, Anki App and Google Images for flashcards….

To Sound Like a Native, Use Filler Expressions Like a Native

“Language is wine upon the lips.” – Virginia WoolfAs we all speak, whether we notice it or not, we always throw out expressions and idioms. Just to help us think. It’s human nature. Start paying attention to the expressions and idioms you use in your own language when you’re talking. Most of them might even…

Push Yourself from Simple Practice to Real Conversational Mastery

“Do your work with your whole heart, and you will succeed – there’s so little competition.”– Elbert Hubbard Ok, this step is a little tricky to define. But it is an important shift in the way you think and act when you practice English. It makes a very big difference when you are already quite advanced…

How to Read English the Right Way to Progress Faster

“The more you read the more things you’ll know. The more that you learn the more places you’ll go.” – Dr Seuss Reading is a great way to build your vocabulary. Try to read all that you can in English. Appropriate material for your level of English. A very good system of reading is to find…

Pronunciation: Know Your Mouth, the Fast Physical System

“You only need three pieces of information to make any sound: you need to know what to do with your tongue, with your lips, and with your vocal cords, and there aren’t that many options.” – Gabriel WynerPronunciation can be tricky in English… if you study it the wrong way. There are several tricks to…

Create a Daily Habit of English

“Motivation is what gets you started. Habit is what keeps you going.” – Jim Ryun Even though you are learning much faster now than you ever thought possible, it will still take some amount of time to reach your desired level. This is why it’s so important to do two things. One, create a real…

Create SMART Goals to Double Your English Learning Speed

“Without goals, and plans to reach them, you are like a ship that has set sail with no destination.”–Fitzhugh Dodson Setting concrete goals is scientifically proven to increase your learning speed. Our brains are simply directed by goals – the more specific the goals are the better. Your mind is like a heat-seeking missile. It locks…

The Power of Flashcards, Done the Right Way

“We breathe in our first language, and swim in our second.”– Adam GopnikFlash cards are a fun and powerful tool for learning words quickly. Just make sure you use them the correct way. We already know this means always speaking the word in a full sentence, not just alone. Also, use flashcards on the 100…

determiners

Determiners are words like the, my, this, some, either, every, enough, several. Determiners come at the beginning of noun phrases, but they are not adjectives. the moon a nice day my fat old cat this house every week several young students We cannot usually put two determiners together. We can say the house, my house…

How to Use Spaced Repetition for Effortless Word Memory

“There is no substitute for attentive repetition.”  – Daniel CoyleThe Spaced Repetition System for memory is another powerful hack into the way your mind works best. Your mind remembers new words and phrases and lessons in English more easily and for longer, the more times it has been exposed to the thing. If you can…

Memory Tricks to Remember New English Words Instantly

“You are well equipped with an incredible potential for absorbing knowledge. Let your imagination, the key to learning and memory, unleash that brain power and propel you along at ever-increasing speeds.” – Dominic O’BrienImagination is the fuel of learning. Your memory is very visual. All our brains work better with imagery. And if you can…

Find Friendly Words in English Which You Already Know

“Everyone smiles in the same language.” – Unknown It’s wonderful to realize that whatever stage of English you are at, you already know many, many words! These words are called ‘cognates’ or friends – they are words your language shares with English. And there are usually huge numbers of them, whatever your native language is….

Prepare the English You Personally will Use the Most

“I think everyone’s weird. We should all celebrate our individuality and not be embarrassed or ashamed of it.”– Johnny DeppWhen working out the most common words, think carefully about the most common words YOU will use. This is an extra level of efficiency, and it’s also why following English course books is generally a terrible…

Listen to English Every Day to Boost Your Comprehension Skills

“All the world is my school and all humanity is my teacher.”― George WhitmanThere are so many ways you can interact with the English language every day, no matter where you live. Make sure that English becomes a background noise to your life. This way English will sink in and you will simply start to relax into…