Some Quick Steps to Learn English Grammar

Grammar can be pesky and annoying. It is not easy to learn because there are so many rules that simply do not make sense. For example, the pronunciations of ‘cat’ as ‘kat’ and ‘price’ as ‘prise’, does not make sense. Grammar can be defined as a set of notions about the correct use of a…

among and between

1. We say that somebody/something is between two or more clearly separate people or things. We use among when somebody/something is in a group, a crowd or a mass of people or things, which we do not see separately. Compare: – She was standing between Alice and Mary. – She was standing among a crowd…

Best English Learning Resources Online & Apps

“Know what tools you have to fulfill your purpose.”― Steve Maraboli You are such a lucky English learner, because there are so many wonderful resources online to help speed up your learning today. We’ve already mentioned a few amazing resources. Like Skype and Italki.com for speaking daily with native speakers. Vis-Ed.com, Anki App and Google Images for flashcards….

Pronunciation: Know Your Mouth, the Fast Physical System

“You only need three pieces of information to make any sound: you need to know what to do with your tongue, with your lips, and with your vocal cords, and there aren’t that many options.” – Gabriel WynerPronunciation can be tricky in English… if you study it the wrong way. There are several tricks to…

How to Use Spaced Repetition for Effortless Word Memory

“There is no substitute for attentive repetition.”  – Daniel CoyleThe Spaced Repetition System for memory is another powerful hack into the way your mind works best. Your mind remembers new words and phrases and lessons in English more easily and for longer, the more times it has been exposed to the thing. If you can…

Memory Tricks to Remember New English Words Instantly

“You are well equipped with an incredible potential for absorbing knowledge. Let your imagination, the key to learning and memory, unleash that brain power and propel you along at ever-increasing speeds.” – Dominic O’BrienImagination is the fuel of learning. Your memory is very visual. All our brains work better with imagery. And if you can…

spelling: full stops with abbreviations

A full stop is the small dot (.) that comes at the end of a sentence. In American English, full stops are often used after abbreviations (shortened words), and after letters that are used instead of full names. Mr. Lewis Ms. Johnson Andrew J. McCann etc. e.g. U.S.A. S.E. Asia T. S. Eliot In British…

How to Destroy Your Fear of Speaking English

“Curiosity will conquer fear even more than bravery will.” – James Stephens English students can often be held back by a fear of speaking, especially to native speakers. Don’t worry if this is you, it’s quite common and there are many ways to get past it. Firstly, the entire system in this book is designed exactly…

How to Start Speaking with a Native Speaker Right Away

The key to learning English fast is to start speaking early. And also to focus all the time on speaking complete sentences. Not talking about grammar or trying to remember big lists of vocab, or listening to lots of other non-native speakers talk in a large, crowded classroom. Start making sentences and having conversation today. And make…

almost and nearly

1. There is not usually much difference between almost and nearly, and we can often use both with the same meaning. I ve nearly finished.        I ve almost finished. Sometimes almost is a little ‘nearer’ than nearly. 2. We do not usually use nearly with negative words: never, nobody, no-one, nothing, nowhere,…

How to Think Like an English Language Master

“What we learn with pleasure we never forget.” – Alfred Mercier Your goal is to be able to comfortably talk English. And to get there you have to enjoy the journey. People who master languages teach themselves to enjoy the process. The truth is learning English and simply making progress is a pleasure in itself….

can and could: ability

Present – We use can to talk about present or ‘general’ ability. – Look I can do it! I can do it! I can read Italian, but I can’t speak it. Future – We use will be able to to talk about future ability. – I’ll be able to speak good English in a few…

contractions

Sometimes we make two words into one: for exampleI’ve /aiv/ ( = I have); don’t /daunt/ ( = do not). These forms are called ‘contractions’. There are two kinds: [pronoun + auxiliary verb auxiliary verb + not] I’ve you’ll he’d aren’t isn’t hadn’t we’re they’ve it’s don’t won’t (= will not) The forms Ve, ‘//,’d,…

The hidden secrets that will help you learn English in a weekend

Since you can read English, you could strive to perfect it in one weekend. It will not be easy to learn everything there is to learn in a weekend but if you work hard enough, it can be done. However, implement what you learn is probably the hardest part. Speak English daily Do not slip up and…

Simple Techniques for Memorizing Extensive Vocabulary Phrases and Idioms

The hardest part is memorizing all those new words! It has to be done though. You cannot hope to master the language successfully without learning the words and phrases that make it up. The best way to expand your vocabulary and knowledge of idioms is through reading.Hence, making that list of new words is important! However,…

Interesting facts about English Language

1.    Symbols, “@#$%&!”, to represent an obscenity or swearword are called grawlixes. 2.    “queue” – The word “queue” is the only word in the English Language that is still pronounced the same way when the last four letters are removed. 3.    “Dammit I’m mad” is the same spelt backwards 4.    “Set” of all the words…

reported speech and direct speech

1. There are two ways of telling a person what somebody else said. a. direct speech – SUE: What did Bill say? – PETER: He said ‘I want to go home ‘. b. reported speech – SUE: What did Bill say? – PETER: He said that he wanted to go home. When we use ‘direct…

ages

1. We talk about people’s ages with [ be + number ] – He is thirty-five. – She will be twenty-one next year. or [ be + number + years old ] – He is thirty-five years old. To ask about somebody’s age, say How old are you? (What is your age? is correct but…

after (conjunction)

{clause + after + clause after + clause, + clause} 1. – We can use afterlo join two clauses. – We can either say: B happened after A happened – OR After A happened, B happened. – The meaning is the same: A happened first. – Note the comma (,) in the second structure. –…

adverbs: position (general)

Different kinds of adverbs go in different positions in a clause. Here are some general rules (Note: these rules apply both to one-word adverbs and to adverb phrases of two or more words.) Verb and object We do not usually put adverbs between a verb and its object. […adverb + verb + object] [verb +…

adverbs of manner

1. Adverbs of manner say how something happens. Examples: happily, quickly, terribly, beautifully, badly, well, fast. Don’t confuse these adverbs with adjectives (happy, quick, etc.) We use adverbs, not adjectives, to modify verbs. verb + adverb She sang beautifully (NOT  She sang beautiful) We’ll have to think quickly. (NOT think quick) 2. She danced happily…

adjectives without nouns

1. We cannot usually leave out a noun after an adjective. Poor little boy! (NOT – Poor little) But there are some exceptions: 2. We sometimes leave out a noun when we are talking about a choice between two or three different kinds (of car, milk, cigarette, bread, for example). Have you got any bread…

active verb forms

This is a list of all the affirmative active forms of an English regular verb, with their names. For passive forms, For negatives, . For irregular verbs, . For more information about the forms and their uses, see the entry for each one. For details of auxiliary and modal auxiliary verbs, see the entry for…

across and through

– The difference between across and through is like the difference between on and in. – Across is used for a movement on a surface. – Through is used for a movement in a three-dimensional space, with things on all sides. Compare: – We walked across the ice. – I walked through the wood. –…

requests

We usually ask people to do things for us by making yes/no questions. (This is because a yes/no question leaves people free to say ‘No’ if they want to.) Common structures used in polite requests: Could you possibly help me for a few minutes? (very polite) I wonder if you could help me for a…

adverbs: position (details)

Connecting adverbs – These adverbs join a clause to what came before. – Examples: however, then, next, besides, anyway – Position: beginning of clause. – Some of us wanted to change the system; however, not everybody agreed. – I worked without stopping until five o’clock. Then I went home. – Next, I want to say…

future: present progressive and going to

We use these two present tenses to talk about future actions and events which are already decided now; they are planned, or they are starting to happen: we can see them coming. Present progressive We often say that something is happening in the future. We talk like this about actions that are already planned; we…

present tenses: introduction

‘Present tenses’ are used to talk about several different kinds of time. Now, at this exact moment NOW Around now PAST FUTURE ‘General time’ — at any time, all the time, not just around now When we talk about time ‘around now’, we usually use the ‘present progressive tense’ (for example, I’m going, I’m reading)….

spelling: ie and ei

The sound IV.I (as in believe) is often written ie, but not usually ei. However, we write ei after c. English children learn a rhyme: ‘I’before e except after c.’ believe chief field grief ceiling deceive receive receipt

way

We often use way ( = method) in expressions without a preposition. You’re doing it (in) the wrong way. You put in the cassette this way. Do it any way you like. In relative structures, we often use the way that . . . I don’t like the way (that) you’re doing it. After way,…