How to Read English the Right Way to Progress Faster

“The more you read the more things you’ll know. The more that you learn the more places you’ll go.” – Dr Seuss Reading is a great way to build your vocabulary. Try to read all that you can in English. Appropriate material for your level of English. A very good system of reading is to find…

Manner

Manner = how we do something Fast and slow: Right and wrong: This sentence is right. I like coffee very much. / This sentence is wrong. I like very much coffee. X Loud and quiet: The teacher speaks very quietly. We can’t hear him. She sang loudly.

Time words (I): days, months and seasons

Basic time words: There are: 365 days in a year 12 months in a year 52 weeks in a year 7 days in a week 2 weeks in a fortnight 24 hours in a day 60 minutes in an hour. (We say an hour ) 60 seconds in a minute 100 years in a century…

Moving

Without transport: Transport: You go by car / plane / bus / train / bike / motorbike / ship / taxi / underground [NOT by-a-car]. You take a bus / train / taxi / plane and you take the underground. You ride a bicycle / bike / motorbike / horse. You drive a car /…

afternoon, evening and night

1. Afternoon changes to evening when it starts getting dark, more or less. However, it depends on the time of year. In summer, we stop saying afternoon by six o’clock, even if it is still light. In winter we go on saying afternoon until at least five o’clock, even if it is dark. 2. Evening…

punctuation: semi-colons and full stops

We can use semi-colons (;) or full stops (.) between grammatically separate sentences. Some people like Picasso. Others dislike him. Some people like Picasso; others dislike him. We often prefer semi-colons when the ideas are very closely connected. It is a good idea; whether it will work or not is another question.

articles: talking in general

We do not use the with uncountable or plural nouns to talk about things in general — to talk about all books, all people or all life, for example. The never means ‘all’. Compare: Did you remember to buy the books7 (= particular books which I asked you to buy) Books are expensive. (NOT The…

infinitive of purpose

We often use an infinitive to talk about a person’s purpose — why he or she does something. I sat down for a minute to rest He went abroad to forget I’m going to Austria to learn German In a more formal style, we often use in order to or so as to. He got…

another

[another + singular noun another + few/number + plural noun] Another is one word. He’s bought another car. {NOT an other car.) Normally, we only use another with singular countable nouns. Compare: Would you like another potato? Would you like some more meat? {NOT … another meat?) Would you like some more peas? (NOT ….

can: permission, offers, requests and orders

Permission We use can to ask for and give permission. Can I ask you something?’ ‘Yes, of course you can.’ Can I have some more tea? You can go now if you want to. We also use could to ask tor permission. This is more polite or formal. Could I ask you something, if you’re…

this and that

We use this to talk about people and things which are close to the speaker, and for situations that we are in at the moment of speaking. I don’t know what I’m doing in this country. This is very nice — how do you cook it? Get this cat off my shoulder. We use that…

sound

Sound is a ‘copula verb’ . We use it with adjectives, not adverbs. You sound unhappy. What’s the matter? We do not usually use sound in progressive tenses. The car sounds a bit funny. (NOT The car is sounding . . .) Note the structure sound like. That sounds like Arthur coming upstairs.

each other and one another

Each other and one another mean the same. Mary and I write to each other/one another every day. They sat without looking at each other/one another. There is a possessive each other’s/one another’s. We often borrow each other’s clothes. They stood looking into one another’s eyes. Each other/one another are not used as subjects. We…

Push Yourself from Simple Practice to Real Conversational Mastery

“Do your work with your whole heart, and you will succeed – there’s so little competition.”– Elbert Hubbard Ok, this step is a little tricky to define. But it is an important shift in the way you think and act when you practice English. It makes a very big difference when you are already quite advanced…

Bring Brought Brought

Bring and take take = from here to there bring = from there to here Are you going to school? Take your books, (from here to the school) Are you going to the kitchen? Can you bring me a glass? (from the kitchen to here) Bring somebody something Bring something back It’s raining. You can…

Take took taken

Take with time (it + take + person + time) It takes Alan 20 minutes to get to work. Alan’s house —? 20 minutes —? Alan’s office It takes Miriam 45 minutes to get to work. Miriam’s flat —? 45 minutes —? Miriam’s office I go to school/university every day. It takes me 30 minutes….

names and titles

We can use names and titles when we talk about people, and when we talk to them. There are differences. Talking about people When we talk about people, we can name them in four ways. a. First name. This is informal. We use first names mostly to talk about friends and children. Where’s Peter? He…

suggest

We do not use suggest with object + infinitive. My uncle suggested that I should get a job in a bank. My uncle suggested getting a job in a bank. (NOT My uncle suggested me to get . . .)

Time clauses

Time clauses [ If + Present Simple ] +  [ will/won’t + verb ] When: I’ll call you when I get home. As soon as: I’ll call you as soon as I get home. Before: I’ll call you before I leave. After: I’ll call you after I speak to Susan. Until/till: I’ll call you until…

Do did done

Do as auxiliary What are you doing? Do as a general verb What do you do to relax? I listen to music. Don’t do that, Tommy. What are the people in the picture doing? They’re dancing. What do you do? What do you do? (= What is your job?) I’m a student, or I’m a…

Go went gone

Go Go means to move from one place to another. I go to work by bike. My brother goes by car. We went to Paris last summer. Shall we go to the swimming pool today? You can go to a place on foot or in some kind of transport. To make it clear that we…

abbreviations

We usually write abbreviations without full stops in British English. Mr (NOT -Mfr) = Mister Ltd = Limited (company) kg = kilogram the BBC = the British Broadcasting Corporation the USA = the United States of America NATO = the North Atlantic Treaty Organization OPEC = the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries Some abbreviations are…

as, because and since (reason)

[as/because/since + clause + clause clause + as/because/since + clause] Because is used when we give the reason for something. Because I was ill for six months I lost my job. If the reason is the most important idea, we put it at the end of the sentence. Why am I leaving? I’m leaving because…

Education: University

Subjects You can normally do/study these subjects at university but not always at school: Note: The underlined letters in some of the words above show the syllable with the main stress. Also note that the first syllable of psychology is pronounced /sai/ like ‘my’. Studying at (a British) university If you want to go to…

should

Forms Should is a ‘modal auxiliary verb’. It has no -s in the third person singular. He should be here soon. (NOT He shouids . . .) Questions and negatives are made without do. Should we tell Judy? (NOT Do we should . . . ?) Should is followed by an infinitive without to. Should…

have: auxiliary verb

[have + past participle] We use have as an auxiliary verb to make ‘perfect ‘ verb forms. Have you heard about Peter and Corinne? I realized that I had met him before. We ‘II have been living here for two years next Sunday. I would have told you, but I didn’t see you. I’d like…

next and the next

Next week, next month etc is the week or month just after this one. If I am speaking in July, next month is August; if I am speaking in 1985, next year is 1986. (Note that prepositions are not used before these time-expressions.) Goodbye! See you next week! I’m spending next Christmas with my family….

explain

After explain, we use to before an indirect object. I explained my problem to her (NOT I explained her my problem.) Can you explain (to me) how to get to your house?

fewer and less

Fewer is the comparative of few (used before plural nouns). Less is the comparative of little (used before uncountable nouns, which are singular). few problems fewer problems little money less money I’ve got fewer problems than I used to have. I earn less money than a postman. In informal English, some people use less with…

go: been and gone

If somebody has gone to a place, he or she is there now, or on the way. Is Lucy here?’ ‘No, she s gone to London.’ If somebody has been to a place, he or she has travelled there and come back. I’ve been to London six times this week. Have you ever been to…