all and every

1.
All and every have similar meanings. (Every means ‘all without exception’.)
They are used in different structures:
[all + plural]
All children need love.
All cities are noisy.

[every + singular]
Every child needs love.
Every city is noisy.

2.

We can use all, but not every, before a determiner (for example the, my, this).

[all + determiner + plural]
Please switch off all the lights.
I Ve written to all my friends

[every + singular]
Please switch off every light.
I Ve written to every friend I have.
(NOT . . . every my friend.)

3.

We can use all, but not every, with uncountable nouns.
I like all music. (NOT . . . every music.)
We can use all with some singular countable nouns, to mean ‘every part of’, ‘the whole of. Compare:
She was here all day(= from morning to night)
She was here every day ( = Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday . . .)

4.

At the beginning of negative sentences, we use these structures:
[Not all/every + noun + affirmative verb]
Not all Scottish people drink whisky.
Not every student passed the exam.
[No + noun + affirmative verb None of + determiner + noun + affirmative verb]
No Scottish people work in our office.
None of the students passed the exam.

5.

We do not usually use all and every alone without nouns. Instead, we say all of it/them and every one.
‘She’s eaten ait the cakes. ‘ ‘What, all of them?’ ‘Yes, every one.