Stay and Remain – Stay

Stay and Remain – Stay Don’t Say:We remained in a very good hotel. Say:We stayed in a very good hotel.

empathy / sympathy

Empathy refers to the ability to deeply understand and share someone else’s feelings or situation. The verb form is empathize. For example, if you were bullied or made fun of as a child, you have empathy with kids who are currently being bullied. If you started your own company and you know how challenging it…

See or watch a game, not to follow a game

See or watch a game, not to follow a game Don’t Say:Did you follow the game? Say:Did you see (or watch) the game? Note:Avoid saying to follow the lesson when you mean to attend the class.

all of / each of

We use each to talk about objects individually, and all to talk about objects as a group: The teacher gave a different task to each student. (“each” emphasizes the individuality of the members of the group) The teacher gave tests to all the students. (“all” emphasizes the students as a group) In a similar way,…

Health: injuries

Common injuries An injury is damage to part of your body, usually caused by an accident in the home, on the roads, or during a game, e.g. of football. Here are some common injuries: Hospital treatment Look carefully at the key words in these texts. John fell off a chair, hit his head on the…

alien / foreigner / stranger

A stranger is a person you don’t know: – When I was a child, my mother taught me not to get into a car with a stranger. – When my car broke down, a kind stranger stopped to help me. A foreigner is someone who comes from another country: – This town is a popular…

Some Quick Steps to Learn English Grammar

Grammar can be pesky and annoying. It is not easy to learn because there are so many rules that simply do not make sense. For example, the pronunciations of ‘cat’ as ‘kat’ and ‘price’ as ‘prise’, does not make sense. Grammar can be defined as a set of notions about the correct use of a…

Wrong use of the with abstract nouns

Wrong use of the with abstract nouns Don’t Say:The bravery is a great virtue. Say:Bravery is a great virtue. Note:Abstract nouns, used in a particular sense, use the article: The bravery of the Spartans was renowned. Abstract nouns, if used in a general sense, can’t take the article.

Opposite to, not from

Opposite to, not from Don’t Say:Their house is opposite from ours. Say:Their house is opposite to ours. Note:Opposite Ours is also correct.

Headline English

Headline writers try to catch the reader’s eye by using as few words as possible. The language headlines use is, consequently, unusual in a number of ways. • Grammar words like articles or auxiliary verbs are often left out, e.g. EARLY CUT FORECAST IN INTEREST RATES • A simple form of the verb is used,…

aim / goal / objective

Many people use these words interchangeably; there is really very little difference between them. In everyday spoken English, the most common word is goal. Aim and objective are usually used in more formal writing. ne small difference is that an objective is more specific than a goal, for example: Our goal is to improve health…

Present Perfect Simple Tense

Present Perfect Simple Tense have + past participle things you have done in your life – Have you ever been to Mexico? – I’ve tried sushi before. Have you? – He’s lived in many different countries. number of times you have done something – I’ve been to Paris three times. – How many times have…

Before for Ago

Before for Ago Don’t Say:I saw your friend before two weeks. Say:I saw your friend two weeks ago. Note:When we use ago, the verb is always in the simple past tense He- came five minutes ago.

after (preposition); afterwards (adverb)

After is a preposition: it can be followed by a noun or an -ing form. We ate in a restaurant after the film. After seeing the film, we ate in a restaurant After is not an adverb: we do not use it with the same meaning as afterwards, then or after that. We went to…

the adjective phrase

An adjective phrase is a prepositional phrase that modifies a noun or a pronoun. This phrase answers the question Which one? The adjective phrase follows right after the noun or pronoun that it modifies or describes. Generally, if you cannot logically move the prepositional phrase within the sentence, it is most often an adjective phrase….

in case

We use in case to talk about things we do because something else might happen. Take an umbrella in case it rains. (= . . . because it might rain.) I’ve bought a chicken in case your mother stays to lunch. I wrote down her address in case I forgot it. After in case, we…

Animals and pets

Farm Animals: Pets: These animals are often pets. Parrots and budgies are birds. You take your dog for a walk but you don’t usually take your cat for a walk.

The career ladder

Getting a job When Paul left school he applied for (= wrote an official request for) a job in the accounts department of a local engineering company. They gave him a job as a trainee (= a very junior person in a company). He didn’t earn very much but they gave him a lot of…

feel

Feel has several meanings. to touch something. – Feel the car seat. It’s wet. – Progressive tenses are possible. – ‘ What are you doing?’ I’m feeling the shirts to see if they are dry.’ to receive physical sensations. – I suddenly felt something on my leg. – We do not use progressive tenses, but…

Using any for two, instead of either

Using any for two, instead of either Don’t Say: Any of these two books is good. Say: Either of these two books is good. Note: Either means one or the other of two, any means one of three or more Any of these books will do.

On the road

Road features An accident Read the text and use the context and the diagram to help you with the key words. There was a serious accident on one of the main roads into Stuttgart this morning. An old lorry (AmEng = truck) broke down in the middle of the road, and the driver couldn’t move…

Words you may confuse

This unit looks at words which are easy to mix up. Similar sounds: lose/loose A: Why do I always lose my keys! B: Here they are. A: Oh, thank you! If you lose something, you do not know where it is / you can’t find it. These trousers are very loose, (because they are too…

should, ought and must

Should and ought are very similar. They are both used to talk about obligation and duty, to give advice, and to say what we think it is right for people to do. You ought to/should see ‘Daughter of the Moon’ — it’s a great film. There is sometimes a small difference. We use should or…

review / revise

If you review a document, it means you read it and examine it (and maybe have some ideas to improve it) – but you don’t make any changes. If you revise a document, it means you change the text to correct errors or make improvements. When preparing for a test, it’s a good idea to…

English language words

Parts of speech Special terms Uncountable noun: (U) a noun which has no plural form and cannot be used with the indefinite article, e.g. information. Plural noun: (pi) a noun which only has a plural form and cannot be used with the indefinite article, e.g. trousers. Infinitive: the base form of a verb, e.g. (to)…

Complain about, not for

Complain about, not for Don’t Say:Annette complained for the weather. Say:Annette complained about the weather. Note:When talking about illness we use complain of. We Say: She complained of a sore throat.

until and by

We use until to talk about a situation or state that will continue up to a certain moment. Can I stay until the weekend? We use by to talk about an action that will happen on or before a future moment. You ‘II have to leave by Monday midday at the latest. ( = at…