5 Phrases for Promises & Resolutions

1. I really should…2. I promise that I’ll…3. I swear I’ll / I won’t… (a very strong promise)4. No matter what happens, I’m going to…5. Come hell or high water, I’ll…#4 and #5 express your determination to do something, even if obstacles appear.

Prepositions after useful

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. useful for – Useful for those at-work times. – Useful for test and development. – Useful for including inline CSS. – Your bravado may impress your wife but not useful for the emancipation of the people. – We need to make…

Prepositions after explicit

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. explicit in – I wasn’t explicit in my comment. – It’s explicit in the Lisbon treaty. – I was pretty explicit in my response. – Concepts such as ‘ Fixed level ‘ structures are no longer explicit in the interface. –…

Using the past tense instead of the past perfect

Using the past tense instead of the past perfect Don’t Say:The train already left before I arrived. Say:The train had already left before I arrived. Note:Don’t use the present tense and the past perfect in the same sentence. It would be incorrect to Say: My brother says that he had not gone to the cinema…

Misuse of able as a verb

Misuse of able as a verb Don’t Say:The poor man doesn’t able to pay. Say:The poor man isn’t able to pay. Note:Able is an adjective, and we can’t use it as a verb.

5 Ways to Respond to an Apology

1. That’s OK.2. It happens.3. No problem.4. Don’t worry about it.5. I forgive you. (for serious problems)

Prepositions after pure

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. pure in – The pure in heart will see God. – They aren’t pure in the least bit. – It was subtle and pure in the book. – The pure in heart are those whose vision is totally free of any…

discreet / discrete

These words are pronounced the same, and they are both adjectives. Discrete means separate, distinct, individual: The two companies have a partnership, but they are discrete entities. We offer three discrete service plans: internet only, internet + cell phone, and internet + cell phone + TV. Discreet describes something that is modest and does not…

Prepositions after catastrophic

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. catastrophic for – It was catastrophic for the nation. – It’s not quite as catastrophic for them. – The outcome would be catastrophic for us all. – The first would be catastrophic for refugees, the latter would result in riots. –…

Prepositions after existing

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. existing in – Existing in this moment is enough. – Men of the secret! Existing in silence. – Living is existing in the activity of life. – Existing in community offers you the benefit of encouragement, help, and motivation. – So…

5 Ways to Ask Someone Else to Do Something

1. (more formal) Would you mind… [opening the window]?2. Could you please… [turn off the lights]?3. (informal) Can you… [pass me the chicken]?4. Please… [send me the information].5. I’d appreciate it if you could… [wash the dishes].

House and Home

House and Home Don’t Say:You should go to your house now. Say:You should go home now. Note:Home may also denote ones own country When an Englishman abroad says: im going home this summer he means going to England. Take care not to say my house, his house, or your house when you should say home…

Prepositions after lost

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. lost in – It does get lost in the detail a bit. – But he was far from lost in the bunch. – But that will get lost in the shuffle. – Acting in the long-range US national interest seems to…

hear and listen (to)

1. Hear is the ordinary word to say that something ‘comes to our ears’. Suddenly I heard a strange noise. Can you hear me? Did you hear the Queen’s speech yesterday? Hear ts not used in progressive tenses. When we want to say that we hear something at the moment of speaking, we often use…

Shall and Will – In the third person 2

Shall and Will – In the third person 2 Don’t Say:My mind is made up: he will/’lf go. Say:My mind is made up: he shall go. Note:Should, the past tense of shall, and would, the past tense of will, have the same differences of meaning and use as the present forms shall and will I…

Ages and stages

Growing up Note: For boys, the period between 14-17 approximately (slightly younger for girls) is called adolescence, i.e. you are an adolescent. In law you are an adult at the age of 18, but many people think of you as an adult when you leave school. Childhood and adolescence Sam (on the right) was born…

complex sentences

A complex sentence has one main (or independent) clause and one (or more) subordinate (or dependent) clauses. In each sentence, the main clause is underlined, and the subordinate clause is in italics. After the storm subsided, we went out to inspect the grounds. The ticket that you received in the mail is the right one….

pray / prey

The word pray is a verb, and it means to talk to God or to any spirit or deity that is the object of worship: The mother is praying for her son to recover from his illness. The tribe prayed to the gods for rain. The noun form is a prayer (referring to the words…

Prepositions after plentiful

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. plentiful in – Bird life is also plentiful in Shaba. – However fish were plentiful in Egypt. – Gas and oil is plentiful in the region. – The sage hen or sage grouse, once very plentiful in Nevada, gives us this…

Leave for Let

Leave for Let Don’t Say:Penny didn’t leave me to get my book. Say:Penny didn’t let me get my book. Note:Let means to allow Leave means to abandon or to go away from: Do you leave your books at school?

Prepositions after commensurate

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. commensurate with – CONDITION Commensurate with age &; use. – Salary Range: Commensurate with experience. – Let our repentance be commensurate with our sin. – A gift’s value should be commensurate with the level of the business dealings. – Slavery is…

Wrong use of the with nature

Wrong use of the with nature Don’t Say:The nature is beautiful in spring. Say:Nature is beautiful in spring. Note:Use the definite article if nature is used in other meanings: If is in the nature of a dog to be faithful.

Prepositions – For

1. For indicates a recipient or beneficiary. Pattern 1: noun + for + nounI have a present for you. Nouns often used before for:answer, cure, gift, idea, job, message, letter, plan, present, project, question, suggestion, surprise, secret Pattern 2: noun + for + 0 nounWe have news for you. Typical nouns before for:advice, help, information,…

Prepositions after current

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. current in – The current in the East River, N. – Check the current in these wires. – And work like hell to stay current in it. – If your company was current in the CCR; that information has been ported…

Prepositions after assertive

Prepositions after Adjectives – see what prepositions are generally used after it in English. assertive in – We can be assertive in positive ways. – Be assertive in things that you deserve. – Obama to be more assertive in the debates. – We are assertive in our far-reaching operating strategy to expand our global presence….

broad and wide

Wide is used for the physical distance from one side of something to the other. We live in a very wide street. The car’s too wide for the garage. Broad is mostly used in abstract expressions. Some examples: broad agreement ( = agreement on most points) broad-minded ( = tolerant) broad daylight ( = full,…

The continuous form of the tense misused

The continuous form of the tense misused Don’t Say:I m understanding the lesson now. Say:I understand the lesson now. Note:As a rule, verbs denoting a state rather than an act have.no continuous forms, like understand, know, believe, like, love, belong, prefer consist, mean, hear, see, etc.

Omission of a or an from make a noise, etc

Omission of a or an from make a noise, etc Don’t Say:I told them not to make noise. Say:I told them not to make a noise. Note:Also to make a mistake, to make a fortune, to make a will, to make an impression, to make an experiment, to make an attempt-

taste

We can use taste in three ways. 1. Taste can be a ‘copula verb’. We can describe the taste of food etc by using [taste + adjective] or [taste of + noun]. Progressive tenses are not used. [taste + adjective] This tastes nice What’s in it? (NOT This is tasting . . .) The wine…

Everyday problems

Things that go wrong in houses and flats Everyday minor injuries Other everyday problems – I’ve mislaid Bob’s letter. Have you seen it anywhere? [put it somewhere and can’t find it] – She spilt some coffee on the carpet. I hope it doesn’t stain, [leave a permanent mark] – I overslept this morning and was…