Point to or at a person or thing, not point a person or thing

Point to or at a person or thing, not point a person or thing Don’t Say:He pointed the map on the wall. Say:He pointed to the map on the wall. Or: He pointed at the map on the wall. Note:Also point out He pointed out the boy who did it To point (without any preposition)…

Omission of the personal pronoun after a quotation

Omission of the personal pronoun after a quotation Don’t Say:‘I’m learning English,’ said. Say:‘I’m learning English,’ he said. Note:After a quotation, express the personal pronoun as the subject of the reporting verb.

As and Like

As and Like Don’t Say:You don’t look as your mother. Say:You don’t look like your mother. Note:As is A conjunction, and is usually followed by a noun or pronoun in the nominative case like isn’t a conjunction, but an adjective which behaves like a preposition in being followed by a noun or pronoun in the…

Wrong repetition of object with infinitive

Wrong repetition of object with infinitive Don’t Say:I bought an English book to read it. Say:I bought an English book to read. Note:Don’t repeat an object with an infinitive of purpose if the verb takes an object.

5 Ways to Make & Respond to an Offer

1. (more formal) Would you like a drink?2. (informal) Do you want some water?3. Can I get you something to eat?4. That’d be great, thanks.(= yes)5. No, thanks. I’m OK.(= no)

past time: past perfect simple and progressive

Forms Past perfect simple Affirmative Question Negative I had worked you had worked he had worked, etc had I worked? had you worked? had he worked? etc I had not worked you had not worked, etc Past perfect progressive Affirmative Question Negative I had been working you had been working, etc had I been working?…

Wrong use of that in direct speech

Wrong use of that in direct speech Don’t Say:She said that, I’m sure to pass.’ Say:She said, I’m sure to pass.’ Note:In indirect, speech we Say: He said thst he was sure to pass. We can’t use that in direct speech, i.e. when we repeat the words that some other person has spoken without any…

Using an intransitive verb in the passive form

Using an intransitive verb in the passive form Don’t Say:She was disappeared from the house. Say:She disappeared from the house. Note:As a rule, don’t use intransitive verbs, like appear, seem, become, consist, in the passive form. Intransitive verbs dorYt have an object.

Law and Order

The police: They do a number of things. When someone commits a crime (= breaks the law and does something wrong / illegal / against the law) the police must investigate (= try to find out what happened / who is responsible). If they find the person responsible for the crime, they arrest them (=…

working on + (noun)

I’m working on + (noun) I’m is a contraction for the words I am. The phrase ‘working on’ relays a physical or mental effort towards an accomplishment. Here are some examples: I’m working on a big project. I’m working on training my dog. I’m working on making new friends. I’m working on educating myself. I’m…

10 Expressions for Bad People

1. He’s a creep. (= unpleasant, suspicious, makes you afraid/uneasy)2. He’s a pervert. (= someone with disgusting sexual tendencies)3. He’s a sicko.4. He’s a scumbag.5. He’s an asshole.6. He’s a jerk.7. He’s a bastard.8. She’s a bitch. (= she’s irritating and unpleasant)9. She’s a psycho. (= crazy, irrational)10. She’s a slut. (= she has sex…

perfect tenses with this is the first time…, etc

We use a present perfect tense after the following expressions: This/that/it is the first/second/third/fourth/etc This/that/it is the only . . . This/that/it is the best/worst/finest/most interesting/etc Examples: This is the first time (that) I’ve heard her sing. That’s the third time you’ve asked me that question. It’s one of the most interesting books I’ve ever…

I don’t think used instead of I don’t think so

I don’t think used instead of I don’t think so Don’t Say:I don’t think. Say:I don’t think so. Note:I don’t think means I don’t use my brains, while I don’t think so means I am not of that opinion.

Using under the rain instead of in the rain

Using under the rain instead of in the rain Don’t Say:They played football under the rain. Say:They played football in the rain. Note:Also in the sun and in the shade He was sitttng in the sun (or in the shade)

also / as well / too

These words are all used to show similarity or sameness: Jeff plays soccer. Greg plays soccer, too. Jeff plays soccer. Greg also plays soccer. Jeff plays soccer. Greg plays soccer as well. The only difference is in their placement in the sentence. Too and as well are used at the end of a sentence. (As…

Describing character

Opposites Many positive words describing character have clear opposites with a negative meaning. Jane is very tense at the moment because of her exams, but she’s usually quite relaxed and easy-going about most things. I think the weather influences me a lot: when it’s sunny I feel more cheerful and optimistic; but when it’s cold…

Individual for Person/People

Individual for Person/People Don’t Say:There were five individuals in the shop. Say:There were five people in the shop. Note:Use individual with a single person as opposed to the group: The individual must act for the good of The community.

compound subject and compound predicate

➲A compound subject is two or more subjects in a sentence. These subjects are joined by a conjunction and share the same verb. The compound subject is underlined in each sentence. Happy, Sleepy, and Doc knew Snow White. The horses and the king’s men could not put Humpty Dumpty back together again. She and I…

Hair

Hair Don’t Say:That man has long hairs. Say:That man has long hair. Note:When we use hair to denote a single thread, the plural form is hairs I found two long hairs in my food.

I = subject

Jim = object The teacher called Sarah and me. The teacher = subject Sarah = object me = object My and mine show possession. Use my before the word, and use mine after the word: Paul is my friend. Paul is a friend of mine. Those are my glasses. Those glasses are mine. The word…

ex- / former / previous

Previous means “immediately before,” and former means “at any time in the past.” Your former employer means any employer you have had in your past, at any time. Your previous employer typically means the most recent employer you had in your past. A former president is any of the many people who have held the…

borrow / lend / loan / owe

To lend or loan is to GIVE something to a person temporarily, and to borrow is to RECEIVE something temporarily (and you will need to give it back). If Maria is in class and she doesn’t have a pencil, she could ask her friend Daniel: “Could I borrow a pencil?” Or: “Could you lend/loan me…

past tense with present or future meaning

A past tense does not always have a past meaning. In some kinds of sentence we use verbs like I had, you went or I was wondering to talk about the present or future. After if . If I had the money now I’d buy a car. If you caught the ten o’clock train tomorrow…

Using must or ought to to express a past obligation

Using must or ought to to express a past obligation Don’t Say:You ought to come yesterday. Say:You ought to have come yesterday. Or; You should have come yesterday. Note:In indirect speech use must and ought to as past tenses: He said he must do it. Don’t use must and ought to as past tenses To…

worth … -ing

We can use worth . . . -ing in two structures. [it is (not) worth … -ing (+ object)] It isn’t worth repairing the car. Is it worth visiting Leicester? It’s not worth getting angry with her. [subject + is (not) worth … -ing] The car isn’t worth repairing. Is Leicester worth visiting? She’s not…

moral / morale

As a noun, a moral is the lesson learned from a story – often used in the expression “the moral of the story.” The plural form, morals, has a different meaning. It refers to a person’s standards of determining right and wrong behavior: The doctor refused to perform an abortion because it was against her…

whether and if

In reported questions, we can use both whether and if. I’m not sure whether/if I ‘II have time. I asked whether/if she had any letters for me. We prefer whether before or, especially in a formal style. Let me know whether you can come or not. ( … if … is possible in an informal…

Wrong use of the with abstract nouns

Wrong use of the with abstract nouns Don’t Say:The bravery is a great virtue. Say:Bravery is a great virtue. Note:Abstract nouns, used in a particular sense, use the article: The bravery of the Spartans was renowned. Abstract nouns, if used in a general sense, can’t take the article.

Get /got /got

Get with adjectives: for changes Get wih nouns If you don’t have something you can get it. I want to send a postcard. I have to get a stamp. I’ve finished my studies. Now I want to get a job. My friend is ill! Please get a doctor. Do you want a drink? I can…